Effects of potassium alkali and calcium supplementation on bone turnover in postmenopausal women.

@article{Sakhaee2005EffectsOP,
  title={Effects of potassium alkali and calcium supplementation on bone turnover in postmenopausal women.},
  author={K. Sakhaee and N. Maalouf and S. Abrams and C. Pak},
  journal={The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism},
  year={2005},
  volume={90 6},
  pages={
          3528-33
        }
}
Potassium citrate may improve calcium balance by conferring an alkali load. Calcium supplementation slows postmenopausal bone loss by inhibiting PTH secretion. This study explores whether combined treatment with potassium citrate and calcium citrate is more effective than either agent alone in inhibiting bone loss. In a crossover study involving 18 postmenopausal women, the following treatments were compared: potassium citrate (4.3 g or 40 mmol/d), calcium citrate (800 mg or 20 mmol/d… Expand
Acute effects of calcium carbonate, calcium citrate and potassium citrate on markers of calcium and bone metabolism in young women.
TLDR
The results suggest that potassium citrate has a positive effect on the resorption marker despite low Ca intake, and Ca supplements were absorbed well and decreased S-PTH efficiently. Expand
Potassium citrate supplementation results in sustained improvement in calcium balance in older men and women
TLDR
Readily available, safe, and easily administered in an oral form, potassium citrate has the potential to improve skeletal health and longer‐term trials with definitive outcomes such as bone density and fracture are needed. Expand
Treatment with potassium bicarbonate lowers calcium excretion and bone resorption in older men and women.
TLDR
Bicarbonate, but not potassium, had a favorable effect on bone resorption and calcium excretion, which suggests that increasing the alkali content of the diet may attenuate bone loss in healthy older adults. Expand
The Effect of Alkaline Potassium Salts on Calcium and Bone Metabolism
Diets in industrialized nations are no longer based predominately on potassium rich fruit and vegetables, resulting in substantially lower potassium intakes as well as the alkaline anions such asExpand
Potassium Citrate Supplementation Decreases the Biochemical Markers of Bone Loss in a Group of Osteopenic Women: The Results of a Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study
TLDR
It is suggested that K citrate supplementation improved the beneficial effects of calcium and vitamin D in osteopenic women with a documented potassium and citrate deficit, and a metabolic profile consistent with low-grade acidosis. Expand
Effect of potassium citrate supplementation or increased fruit and vegetable intake on bone metabolism in healthy postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled trial.
TLDR
Two-year potassium citrate supplementation does not reduce bone turnover or increase BMD in healthy postmenopausal women, which suggests that alkali provision does not explain any long-term benefit of fruit and vegetable intake on bone. Expand
The effect of supplementation with alkaline potassium salts on bone metabolism: a meta-analysis
TLDR
This meta-analysis confirms that supplementation with alkaline potassium salts leads to significant reduction in renal calcium excretion and acid excretion, compatible with the concept of increased buffering of hydrogen ions by raised circulating bicarbonate. Expand
POTASSIUM CITRATE DECREASES BONE RESORPTION IN POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN WITH OSTEOPENIA: A RANDOMIZED, DOUBLE-BLIND CLINICAL TRIAL.
  • N. S. Gregory, R. Kumar, +4 authors J. S. Rodman
  • Medicine
  • Endocrine practice : official journal of the American College of Endocrinology and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists
  • 2015
TLDR
In women with postmenopausal osteopenia, treatment with K- citrate for 1 year resulted in a significant decrease in markers of turnover, and K-citrate may serve as a potential treatment for bone loss that is well tolerated and without any significant known long-term consequences. Expand
Biochemical control of bone loss and stone-forming propensity by potassium-calcium citrate after bariatric surgery.
TLDR
In RYGB patients, PCC supplementation inhibited bone resorption by providing bioavailable calcium, reduced the urinary saturation of uric acid, and increased the inhibitor activity against calcium oxalate agglomeration by providing alkali that increased urinary pH and citrate. Expand
Comparison of the Absorption of Calcium Carbonate and Calcium Citrate after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass
IntroductionRoux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) restricts food intake. Consequently, patients consume less calcium. In addition, food no longer passes through the duodenum, the main site of calciumExpand
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In vivo and in vitro evidence indicates that metabolic acidosis, which may occur prior to complete excretion of end products of metabolism, increases urinary calcium excretion. The additional urinaryExpand
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