Effects of pharyngeal muscle activation on airway size and configuration.

@article{Kuna2001EffectsOP,
  title={Effects of pharyngeal muscle activation on airway size and configuration.},
  author={Samuel T. Kuna},
  journal={American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine},
  year={2001},
  volume={164 7},
  pages={
          1236-41
        }
}
  • S. Kuna
  • Published 1 October 2001
  • Medicine, Biology
  • American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
Fiberoptic imaging was performed in six decerebrate, tracheotomized cats to determine the effect of pharyngeal muscle activation on the pharyngeal airway. The fiberoptic scope was advanced through the rostral trachea into the pharynx. Computer-based planimetry was used to measure airway area and maximum anteroposterior and lateral diameters in the rostral oropharynx, velopharynx, and caudal oropharynx. Cuff electrodes stimulated the bilateral distal cut ends of the following nerves: medial… 
Effects of pharyngeal muscle activation on airway pressure-area relationships.
  • S. KunaM. Brennick
  • Medicine, Biology
    American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine
  • 2002
TLDR
The results indicate that the mechanical effects of pharyngeal muscle activation depend not only on the region and muscles activated but also on the intraluminal pressure.
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TLDR
The results reveal that the increase in pharyngeal airway size resulting from stimulation of the medial branch of the hypoglossal nerve is predominantly due to ventral displacement of the ventral and lateral pharygeal walls.
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Exercising pharyngeal musculature and genioglossus is a kind of non-invasive and cost-effective method to treat some OSAHS patients, especially those who are old, without surgical complications, and especially mild and moderate OSA HS patients who do not want to take surgery and continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment.
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TLDR
In the rat, the caudal VP is more collapsible than the rostral VP, and either coactivation of tongue protrudor and retractor muscles or contraction of protrUDor muscles alone makes this region more difficult to close, which appears to be a particularly vulnerable segment of the nasopharyngeal airway.
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TLDR
This study supports hypoglossus nerve stimulation as a treatment option for obstructive sleep apnea because it was as effective as continuous positive airway pressure in reversing inspiratory flow limitation and snoring.
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TLDR
It is suggested that increased mechanical loads and blunted neuromuscular responses are both required for the development of obstructive sleep apnea.
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