Effects of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor antisense knockout on MA-10 Leydig cell proliferation and steroidogenesis.

@article{KellyHershkovitz1998EffectsOP,
  title={Effects of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor antisense knockout on MA-10 Leydig cell proliferation and steroidogenesis.},
  author={Ela Kelly-Hershkovitz and Ronit Weizman and Ilana Spanier and Svetlana Leschiner and Michal Lahav and Gary Weisinger and Moshe Gavish},
  journal={The Journal of biological chemistry},
  year={1998},
  volume={273 10},
  pages={5478-83}
}
The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is not only widely expressed throughout the body, but it is also genetically conserved from bacteria to humans. Many functions have been attributed to it, but its primary role remains a puzzle. In the current study, we stably transfected cultures of MA-10 Leydig cells with either control or 18-kDa PBR antisense knockout plasmids. The antisense knockout vector was driven by the human enkephalin promoter, which contains two cAMP response elements… CONTINUE READING

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