Effects of oral ingestion of sucralose on gut hormone response and appetite in healthy normal-weight subjects

@article{Ford2011EffectsOO,
  title={Effects of oral ingestion of sucralose on gut hormone response and appetite in healthy normal-weight subjects},
  author={Heather E. Ford and V{\'e}ronique Peters and Niamh M. Martin and Michelle L. Sleeth and M. A. Ghatei and Gary S. Frost and Stephen R. Bloom},
  journal={European Journal of Clinical Nutrition},
  year={2011},
  volume={65},
  pages={508-513}
}
Background/Objective:The sweet-taste receptor (T1r2+T1r3) is expressed by enteroendocrine L-cells throughout the gastrointestinal tract. Application of sucralose (a non-calorific, non-metabolisable sweetener) to L-cells in vitro stimulates glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1 secretion, an effect that is inhibited with co-administration of a T1r2+T1r3 inhibitor. We conducted a randomised, single-blinded, crossover study in eight healthy subjects to investigate whether oral ingestion of sucralose could… Expand
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