Effects of nondirective suggestions on pain tolerance, pain threshold and pain intensity perception.

Abstract

In this experiment, we followed the issue whether nondirective suggestions have an effect on pain threshold, pain tolerance, and perception of pain intensity. 48 healthy subjects consented to take part. At intake into the study (t1), pain threshold and pain tolerance were assessed in all subjects using a pressure algometer. Perception of maximum pain intensity perception was rated on a scale of 0 to 25. Seven days later, the session was repeated (t2). Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two groups. One group received nondirective suggestions as pretreatment. Subjects listened to a tape of 20 min. which consisted of general information about pain theory. In this context, suggestions for coping with pain were placed. The other group served as a control and received no pretreatment. Analysis showed that pain tolerance was significantly prolonged in the group who received nondirective suggestions, while pain threshold and perception of maximum pain intensity did not differ across groups. This study demonstrates that nondirective suggestions are effective in prolonging pain tolerance. It can be stated that, beside information, cues on coping with pain may be helpful in clinical practice.

Cite this paper

@article{Neumann1997EffectsON, title={Effects of nondirective suggestions on pain tolerance, pain threshold and pain intensity perception.}, author={Walter D. Neumann and Joachim Kugler and Harald Seelbach and Gertrud M. Kr{\"{u}skemper}, journal={Perceptual and motor skills}, year={1997}, volume={84 3 Pt 1}, pages={963-6} }