Effects of nectar concentration and flower depth on flower handling efficiency of bumble bees

@article{Harder2004EffectsON,
  title={Effects of nectar concentration and flower depth on flower handling efficiency of bumble bees},
  author={Lawrence D. Harder},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={69},
  pages={309-315}
}
  • L. Harder
  • Published 1 May 1986
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Oecologia
SummaryFluid viscosity only affected ingestion rates of bumble bees (Bombus) for solutions greater than 35–40% sucrose (mass of solute per mass of solution). This contrasts with previously published models based on fluid dynamics which predicted continuous depression of ingestion rates with increasing viscosity. Individual bees maintained constant lapping rates regardless of sucrose concentration (up to at least 70%). The decline in ingestion rates at higher concentrations apparently resulted… Expand
Effects of nectar volume and concentration on sugar intake rates of Australian honeyeaters (Meliphagidae)
TLDR
It is argued that variation among plants in nature more closely resembles the latter, “equal sugar presentation” scheme, and therefore, that dilute nectars may indeed represent adaptations for bird pollination. Expand
Nectar foraging behaviour is affected by ant body size in Camponotus mus.
TLDR
Differences in physiological abilities in fluid ingestion due to the insect size could be related to differences in decision-making according to ant size during nectar foraging based on ant body size. Expand
Sucrose intake and percent effort by the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).
TLDR
Information on how viscosity and sucrose concentration affect feeding behavior in ants may assist in future formulations of baits for the control of these pests. Expand
Feeding behavior and social interactions of the Argentine ant Linepithema humile change with sucrose concentration
TLDR
It is shown here that sucrose concentration affects feeding dynamics and modulates decision making related to individual behavior and social interactions of foragers. Expand
The effect of sugar solution type, sugar concentration and viscosity on the imbibition and energy intake rate of bumblebees.
TLDR
Although it was found that sugar solution composition had an impact on both imbibition and energy intake rate, its effect was not as straightforward as that of sugar concentration and viscosity. Expand
Raising the Sugar Content – Orchid Bees Overcome the Constraints of Suction Feeding through Manipulation of Nectar and Pollen Provisions
TLDR
Both male and female euglossines show behaviors that promote evaporative water loss from nectar, suggesting that the behaviors have evolved in concert with suction feeding on dilute nectar from deep floral tubes. Expand
The mechanics of nectar offloading in the bumblebee Bombus terrestris and implications for optimal concentrations during nectar foraging
TLDR
Building a model of foraging energetics, it is shown that including offloading lowers the maximum rate of energy return to the nest and reduces the concentration which maximizes this rate by around 3%, which suggests that bumblebees maximize the overall energy return rather than the instantaneous energy uptake during drinking. Expand
Honeybees prefer warmer nectar and less viscous nectar, regardless of sugar concentration
TLDR
Bees showed strong preferences for both warmer and less viscous nectar, independent of changes in its sugar concentration, which may benefit foraging on nectars that are warmer than air temperature for two reasons that are not mutually exclusive: reduced thermoregulatory costs and faster ingestion times due to the lower viscosity. Expand
Fluid intake rates in ants correlate with their feeding habits.
TLDR
Results showed that fluid intake rate depended, as expected and previously reported in the literature, on sugar concentration and the associated fluid viscosity, and also depended on both the species-specific feeding technique and the extent of specialization on foraging on liquid food. Expand
Nectar intake rate is modulated by changes in sucking pump activity according to colony starvation in carpenter ants
TLDR
Behaviour and electrical activity generated by ants at different starvation levels were analysed during feeding on sucrose solutions and intake-rate modulation according to sugar deprivation is mainly achieved by the ant’s ability to vary the pumping frequency. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 43 REFERENCES
Optimal sugar concentrations of floral nectars —dependence on sugar intake efficiency and foraging costs
TLDR
The model predicts that optimal sugar concentrations vary for particular pollinators as a function of two primary factors: (1) the energy flux derived from the nectar, as discussed above, as well as (2) the relative contribution of transit costs to overall foraging costs. Expand
Effects of nectar concentration on butterfly feeding: measured feeding rates for Thymelicus lineola (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae) and a general feeding model for adult Lepidoptera
TLDR
A new mathematical model was developed to describe the rate — concentration relation based on the Hagen-Poiseuille equation for laminar fluid flow through pipes, which results in a very different feeding rate — sucrose concentration function with the optimal rate of sucrose intake at a concentration of approximately 40%. Expand
Nectar uptake rates and optimal nectar concentrations of two butterfly species
  • P. May
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Oecologia
  • 2004
TLDR
The empirically determined relationship between energy intake rate and nectar concentration esembles that predicted for discontinuous nectar feeders such as hummingbirds more closely than the relationship predicted for continuous suction feeders, suggesting that other basic assumptions about the feeding mechanism of butterflies should be critically examined. Expand
Flower handling efficiency of bumble bees: morphological aspects of probing time
TLDR
The relation of probing time to flower depth influences the foraging efficiency and choice of flowers by bumble bees. Expand
The effect of nectar abundance on foraging patterns of bumble bees
TLDR
Bumble bees (Bombus spp.) fed more on previously screened, nectar‐rich plots of cow vetch and white clover and remained longer on inflorescences there, than on continually‐exploited plots of these flowers. Expand
Sugar concentrations in nectar from hummingbird flowers
TLDR
It is clear that no statistically significant differences are to be seen between the sugar concentrations of the different flower pollination types in coastal southeast Jamaica, and, if anything, the hummingbird flowers occupy a belowaverage position. Expand
Nectar extraction by hummingbirds: response to different floral characters
TLDR
Handling times of hummingbirds visiting artificial flowers were a positive function of corolla length, nectar volume and nectar concentration, and it is surprising that most hummingbirds have relatively short bills. Expand
Resource heterogeneity and patterns of movement in foraging bumblebees
TLDR
The systematic foraging behavior of B. vagans workers foraging from Aconitum napellus inflorescences may be a mechanism of reducing the revisiting of just-emptied flowers. Expand
Bumble Bee Foraging: The Threshold Departure Rule
The response of queen bumble bees (Bombus appositus) to variations in the distribution and abundance of nectar in multiflowered Delphinium nelsonii inflorescences was used to identify a general ruleExpand
Mechanical determinants of nectar feeding strategy in hummingbirds: energetics, tongue morphology, and licking behavior
TLDR
A fluid dynamical and behavioral model describing the mechanics and energetics of capillary feeding in hummingbirds is developed and identifies certain tongue morphologies and licking frequencies maximizing energy intake that are consistent with available observations on licking behavior and tongue design in nectar feeding birds. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...