Effects of moderate alcohol consumption on cognitive function in women.

@article{Stampfer2005EffectsOM,
  title={Effects of moderate alcohol consumption on cognitive function in women.},
  author={Meir J. Stampfer and Jae Hee Kang and Jennifer Chen and R Cherry and Francine Grodstein},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2005},
  volume={352 3},
  pages={
          245-53
        }
}
BACKGROUND The adverse effects of excess alcohol intake on cognitive function are well established, but the effect of moderate consumption is uncertain. METHODS Between 1995 and 2001, we evaluated cognitive function in 12,480 participants in the Nurses' Health Study who were 70 to 81 years old, with follow-up assessments in 11,102 two years later. The level of alcohol consumption was ascertained regularly beginning in 1980. We calculated multivariate-adjusted mean cognitive scores and… 
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