Effects of memory training on the subjective memory functioning and mental health of older adults: a meta-analysis.

Abstract

The effectiveness of memory training on the subjective memory functioning and mental health of older adults was examined in a meta-analysis. Effect sizes indicated that memory training led to improved subjective memory functioning (d+2 = .19), but the magnitude of the improvement was less than that obtained on objective memory measures (d+2 = .66) in the meta-analysis of P. Verhaeghen, A. Marcoen, and L. Goossens (1992). However, no differences in effectiveness were found among mnemonic training, expectancy modification, or placebo procedures such as unstructured practice. Improvement of subjective memory functioning was enhanced by including pretraining in skills such as the use of imagery and by including interventions to improve participants' attitudes toward the effects of aging on memory functioning.

View Slides
0102030'01'03'05'07'09'11'13'15'17
Citations per Year

113 Citations

Semantic Scholar estimates that this publication has 113 citations based on the available data.

See our FAQ for additional information.

Cite this paper

@article{Floyd1997EffectsOM, title={Effects of memory training on the subjective memory functioning and mental health of older adults: a meta-analysis.}, author={Mark Floyd and Forrest R Scogin}, journal={Psychology and aging}, year={1997}, volume={12 1}, pages={150-61} }