Effects of martial arts on health status: A systematic review

@article{Bu2010EffectsOM,
  title={Effects of martial arts on health status: A systematic review},
  author={Bin Bu and Han Haijun and Liu Yong and Zhang Chaohui and Yang Xiaoyuan and Maria A. Fiatarone Singh},
  journal={Journal of Evidence‐Based Medicine},
  year={2010},
  volume={3}
}
Objective To systematically summarize the evidence for the effects of martial arts on health and fitness, to show the strengths of different types of martial arts, and to get a more complete picture of the impacts of martial arts on health, and also to provide a basis for future research on martial arts as an exercise prescription in exercise therapy. 
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