Effects of increasing metabolism by 2,4-dinitrophenol on respiration and pulmonary gas exchange in the duck.

Abstract

The effects of pharmacologically elevated metabolism on respiration and parabronchial gas exchange were studied in the anesthetized, spontaneously breathing duck using 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), injected in successive single doses of 1.2-2.5 mg per kg body mass. Oxygen uptake, MO2, increased with the cumulative amount of DNP, reaching a sevenfold resting level at the highest DNP level tolerated, 15 mg/kg. Ventilation increased nearly as much as MO2, mainly by an increase in respiratory frequency, fresp. Cardiac output increased somewhat less than MO2, mediated by increases in both cardiac frequency and stroke volume. Arterial blood-gases showed little change; however, mixed venous PO2 dropped significantly, and PCO2 increased significantly, with stimulated metabolism. Pulmonary diffusing capacity, DO2, showed a significant rise with MO2, beyond that expected from a reduction of functional lung heterogeneity. The results show that pharmacological stimulation of metabolism can evoke responses in the respiratory and circulatory systems that are comparable to those observed with exercise. The mechanism by which parabronchial diffusing capacity increases during elevated metabolism remains to be investigated.

Cite this paper

@article{Geiser1984EffectsOI, title={Effects of increasing metabolism by 2,4-dinitrophenol on respiration and pulmonary gas exchange in the duck.}, author={J{\"{u}rgen Geiser and Ronald K. Gratz and Takehiko Hiramoto and Peter Scheid}, journal={Respiration physiology}, year={1984}, volume={57 1}, pages={1-14} }