Effects of increased seawater pCO2 on early development of the oyster Crassostrea gigas

@article{Kurihara2007EffectsOI,
  title={Effects of increased seawater pCO2 on early development of the oyster Crassostrea gigas},
  author={Haruko Kurihara and Shoji Kato and Atsushi Ishimatsu},
  journal={Aquatic Biology},
  year={2007},
  volume={1},
  pages={91-98}
}
This study demonstrated that the increased partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in seawater and the attendant acidification that are projected to occur by the year 2300 will severely impact the early development of the oyster Crassostrea gigas. Eggs of the oyster were artificially fertilized and incubated for 48 h in seawater acidified to pH 7.4 by equilibrating it with CO2-enriched air (CO2 group), and the larval morphology and degree of shell mineralization were compared with the con- trol… Expand

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