Effects of iboga alkaloids on morphine and cocaine self-administration in rats: relationship to tremorigenic effects and to effects on dopamine release in nucleus accumbens and striatum

@article{Glick1994EffectsOI,
  title={Effects of iboga alkaloids on morphine and cocaine self-administration in rats: relationship to tremorigenic effects and to effects on dopamine release in nucleus accumbens and striatum},
  author={Stanley D. Glick and Martin E. Kuehne and John Raucci and Thomas E. Wilson and Danielle Larson and Richard W. Keller and Jeffrey N. Carlson},
  journal={Brain Research},
  year={1994},
  volume={657},
  pages={14-22}
}

Ibogaine-like effects of noribogaine in rats

Short communication Ibogaine-like effects of noribogaine in rats

TLDR
Noribogaine (40 mg/kg) was found to decrease morphine and cocaine self-administration, reduce the locomotor stimulant effect of morphine, and decrease extracellular levels of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens and stiiatum; however, noribogane did not induce any ibogaine-like tremors.

Mechanisms of Antiaddictive Actions of Ibogaine a

TLDR
The authors' ongoing studies in rats suggest that kappa agonist and NMDA antagonist actions contribute to ibogaine's effects on opioid and stimulant self‐administration, while the serotonergic actions may be more important for ibogane‐induced decreases in alcohol intake.

Interactions between iboga agents and methamphetamine sensitization: studies of locomotion and stereotypy in rats

TLDR
Iboga agents augment both the locomotor and stereotypic effects of METH in a manner consistent with previous reports for cocaine, suggesting that iboga agents interact in a similar manner with the neural mechanisms mediating motor hyperactivity induced by the chronic administration of stimulant drugs.

In vivo neurobiological effects of ibogaine and its O-desmethyl metabolite, 12-hydroxyibogamine (noribogaine), in rats.

TLDR
The present findings demonstrate that noribogaine is biologically active and undoubtedly contributes to the in vivo pharmacological profile of ibogaine in rats and appears less apt to produce the adverse effects associated with ibogain, indicating the metabolite may be a safer alternative for medication development.
...

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TLDR
A new attempt at a general theory of addiction is offered, based on the common denominator of the psychomotor stimulants---amphetamine, cocaine, and related drugs---rather than on thecommon denominators of the socalled depressant drugs~opiates, barbiturates, alcohol, and others.