Effects of high‐protein diets on fat‐free mass and muscle protein synthesis following weight loss: a randomized controlled trial

@article{Pasiakos2013EffectsOH,
  title={Effects of high‐protein diets on fat‐free mass and muscle protein synthesis following weight loss: a randomized controlled trial},
  author={Stefan M. Pasiakos and Jay J. Cao and Lee M. Margolis and Edward R Sauter and Leah D. Whigham and James P. McClung and Jennifer C. Rood and John Walter Carbone and Gerald F. Combs and Andrew J. Young},
  journal={The FASEB Journal},
  year={2013},
  volume={27},
  pages={3837 - 3847}
}
The purpose of this work was to determine the effects of varying levels of dietary protein on body composition and muscle protein synthesis during energy deficit (ED). [] Key Method A randomized controlled trial of 39 adults assigned the subjects diets providing protein at 0.8 (recommended dietary allowance; RDA), 1.6 (2×-RDA), and 2.4 (3×-RDA) g kg(-1) d(-1) for 31 d. A 10-d weight-maintenance (WM) period was followed by a 21 d, 40% ED.

Calcium homeostasis and bone metabolic responses to high-protein diets during energy deficit in healthy young adults: a randomized controlled trial.

These data demonstrate that short-term consumption of high-protein diets does not disrupt calcium homeostasis and is not detrimental to skeletal integrity.

Severe negative energy balance during 21 d at high altitude decreases fat‐free mass regardless of dietary protein intake: a randomized controlled trial

Consuming an HP diet did not protect FFM during severe ED at HA and severe negative energy balance during 21 d at high altitude decreases fat‐free mass regardless of dietary protein intake: a randomized controlled trial.

Whole-body protein turnover response to short-term high-protein diets during weight loss: a randomized controlled trial

Consuming dietary protein at levels above the RDA, particularly 3 × -RDA, during short-term weight loss increases protein oxidation with concomitant reductions in net protein balance.

Effects of energy deficit, dietary protein, and feeding on intracellular regulators of skeletal muscle proteolysis

Consuming a protein‐containing mixed meal attenuates Ub‐mediated proteolysis, independent of energy status or dietary protein, as the activities of the 26S proteasome subunits β1, β2, and β5 were lower for fed than for fasted.

Whey protein supplementation preserves postprandial myofibrillar protein synthesis during short-term energy restriction in overweight and obese adults.

It is concluded that whey protein supplementation attenuated the decline in postprandial rates of MPS after weight loss, which may be of importance in the preservation of lean mass during longer-term weight loss interventions.

Pronounced energy restriction with elevated protein intake results in no change in proteolysis and reductions in skeletal muscle protein synthesis that are mitigated by resistance exercise

It is concluded that a reduction in MPS is the main mechanism that underpins LBM loss early in ER in adult men and thatounced energy restriction with elevated protein intake results in no change in proteolysis and reductions in skeletal muscle protein synthesis that are mitigated by resistance exercise.

High protein diets do not attenuate decrements in testosterone and IGF-I during energy deficit.

Considerations for protein intake in managing weight loss in athletes

It is shown that higher protein intakes during periods of energy restriction can enhance fat-free mass preservation, particularly when combined with exercise, and athletes aiming to reduce fat mass and preserve FFM should be advised to consume protein intakes in the range of ∼1.8–2.7 g kg−1 d−1.

The effect of 12 weeks of euenergetic high-protein diet in regulating appetite and body composition of women with normal-weight obesity: a randomised controlled trial

Abstract Normal-weight obesity (NWO) syndrome is associated with metabolic diseases. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of 12 weeks of a high-protein (HP) v. a standard protein (SP)

Low Energy Availability with and without a High-Protein Diet Suppresses Bone Formation and Increases Bone Resorption in Men: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study

Five days of LEA disrupted bone turnover, but these changes were not attenuated by a high-protein diet.
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