Effects of heat on embryos and foetuses

@article{Edwards2003EffectsOH,
  title={Effects of heat on embryos and foetuses},
  author={M. Edwards and R. Saunders and K. Shiota},
  journal={International Journal of Hyperthermia},
  year={2003},
  volume={19},
  pages={295 - 324}
}
Objectives : This paper reviews the effects of elevated maternal temperature on embryo and foetal development in experimental animals and in humans. Conclusions : Hyperthermia during pregnancy can cause embryonic death, abortion, growth retardation and developmental defects. Processes critical to embryonic development, such as cell proliferation, migration, differentiation and programmed cell death (apoptosis) are adversely affected by elevated maternal temperatures, showing some similarity to… Expand
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