Effects of gendered behavior on testosterone in women and men

@article{Anders2015EffectsOG,
  title={Effects of gendered behavior on testosterone in women and men},
  author={Sari M. van Anders and Jeffrey Steiger and Katherine L. Goldey},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2015},
  volume={112},
  pages={13805 - 13810}
}
Significance Human biology is typically studied within the framework of sex (evolved, innate factors) rather than gender (sociocultural factors), despite some attention to nature/nurture interactions. Testosterone is an exemplar of biology studied as natural difference: men’s higher testosterone is typically seen as an innate “sex” difference. However, our experiment demonstrates that gender-related social factors also matter, even for biological measures. Gender socialization may affect… Expand
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