Effects of flunixin meglumine or etodolac treatment on mucosal recovery of equine jejunum after ischemia.

@article{Tomlinson2004EffectsOF,
  title={Effects of flunixin meglumine or etodolac treatment on mucosal recovery of equine jejunum after ischemia.},
  author={Julia E. Tomlinson and Bj. Wilder and Karen M. Young and Anthony T. Blikslager},
  journal={American journal of veterinary research},
  year={2004},
  volume={65 6},
  pages={
          761-9
        }
}
OBJECTIVE To examine the effects of flunixin meglumine and etodolac treatment on recovery of ischemic-injured equine jejunal mucosa after 18 hours of reperfusion. ANIMALS 24 horses. PROCEDURE Jejunum was exposed to 2 hours of ischemia during anesthesia. Horses received saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (12 mL, i.v., q 12 h), flunixin meglumine (1.1 mg/kg, i.v., q 12 h), or etodolac (23 mg/kg, i.v., q 12 h). Tissue specimens were obtained from ischemic-injured and nonischemic jejunum immediately… 

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