Effects of famotidine on gastric pH and residual volume in pediatric surgery

@article{Jahr1991EffectsOF,
  title={Effects of famotidine on gastric pH and residual volume in pediatric surgery},
  author={Jonathan S. Jahr and G. Burckar and S. S. Smith and J. Shapiro and David R. Cook},
  journal={Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica},
  year={1991},
  volume={35}
}
Aspiration pneumonitis is a severe complication of anesthesia. The objectives of this study were to determine if preoperative famotidine, a new histamine2‐receptor antagonist, given by mouth either the evening before or the morning of elective surgery, reduced gastric residual volume and increased gastric pH in pediatric patients. Either famotidine or placebo (or both) were orally administered to 58 children (aged 2–17 years). The patients were randomly assigned to four groups: Famotidine… Expand
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