Effects of extensive temporal lobe damage or mild hypoxia on recollection and familiarity

@article{Yonelinas2002EffectsOE,
  title={Effects of extensive temporal lobe damage or mild hypoxia on recollection and familiarity},
  author={Andrew P. Yonelinas and Neal E. A. Kroll and Joel R. Quamme and Michele M. Lazzara and Mary Jane Sauv{\'e} and Keith F. Widaman and Robert T. Knight},
  journal={Nature Neuroscience},
  year={2002},
  volume={5},
  pages={1236-1241}
}
Memory for past events can be based on recollection or on assessments of familiarity. These two forms of human memory have been studied extensively by philosophers and psychologists, but their neuroanatomical substrates are largely unknown. Here we examined the brain regions that are involved in these two forms of memory by studying patients with damage to different temporal lobe regions. Our results come from (i) structural covariance modeling of recall and recognition, (ii) introspective… 
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The complexity of this task is highlighted by findings indicating that recognition memory can already be affected by preparatory processes prior to stimulus onset, and the need for converging evidence for functional relationships between recollection and familiarity and respective neuroanatomic substrates.
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Evidence is provided that memory impairment in TLE is characterised by disordered recollection and recollective experience, and patients can be consciously aware of deficits in underlying cognitive processes contributing to memory performance.
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TLDR
The methods traditionally used to separate recollection from familiarity instead separate strong memories from weak memories, and it is suggested that these structures work together in a cooperative and complementary way.
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