Effects of experimental fluid-percussion injury of the brain on cerebrovascular reactivity of hypoxia and to hypercapnia.

@article{Lewelt1982EffectsOE,
  title={Effects of experimental fluid-percussion injury of the brain on cerebrovascular reactivity of hypoxia and to hypercapnia.},
  author={W. Lewelt and Larry W. Jenkins and J. Douglas Miller},
  journal={Journal of neurosurgery},
  year={1982},
  volume={56 3},
  pages={
          332-8
        }
}
To test the hypothesis that concussive brain injury interferes with the normal vasodilator response of the cerebral circulation to hypoxemia, 30 cats were subjected to mild (PaO2 50 mm Hg) and severe (PaO2 30 mm Hg) hypoxemia while measurements were made of arterial and intracranial pressure, regional cerebral blood flow (CBF), and arterial blood gases. Ten cats served as controls, 10 were subjected to mild fluid-percussion injury of the brain (0.8 to 1.7 atmospheres (atm)), and 10 to severe… 

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