Effects of electrical stimulation of the mesencephalon and diencephalon on the paradoxical phase of sleep.

Abstract

During paradoxical sleep electrical stimulation of the mesencephalic reticular formation and emotiogenic structures in the mesencephalon and diencephalon produced depression or an increase in the theta rhythm of the hippocampal and entorhinal electrical activity. However, stimulation not involving behavioral arousal did not cause a transition from paradoxical phase into slow wave sleep. The cessation of stimulation restored the normal structure of the paradoxical phase. Stimulation of the reticular formation causing the depression of the hippocampal and entorhinal theta rhythm without behavioral arousal did not affect duration of the paradoxical phase, which was shortened, however, by electrical stimulation of the emotiogenic structures evoking an increase in the hippocampal and entorhinal theta rhythms. Stimulation of ventromedial hypothalamus or septum (during wakefulness inhibiting motivational behavior and emotional stress) caused transition from the paradoxical into slow wave sleep. This is probably caused by a decrease in emotiogenic stress, which during the paradoxical phase is usually on a high level.

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Cite this paper

@article{Oniani1975EffectsOE, title={Effects of electrical stimulation of the mesencephalon and diencephalon on the paradoxical phase of sleep.}, author={T. N. Oniani and Marina Koridze and M. G. Kavkasidze and L. B. Gvetadze}, journal={Acta neurobiologiae experimentalis}, year={1975}, volume={35 4}, pages={323-42} }