Effects of contact, oral and persistent toxicity of selected pesticides on Cotesia plutellae (Hym., Braconidae), a potential parasitoid of Plutella xylostella (Lep., Plutellidae)

@article{Haseeb2002EffectsOC,
  title={Effects of contact, oral and persistent toxicity of selected pesticides on Cotesia plutellae (Hym., Braconidae), a potential parasitoid of Plutella xylostella (Lep., Plutellidae)},
  author={Muhammad Haseeb and Hiroshi Amano},
  journal={Journal of Applied Entomology},
  year={2002},
  volume={126}
}
Cotesia plutellae (Kurd.) is an important larval parasitoid of Plutella xylostella (L.). Effects of contact, oral and persistent toxicity of field doses of selected pesticides on immature and mature stages of this useful wasp were determined in controlled conditions. Contact toxicity tests showed that cartap 75% SG, chlorfenapyr 10% F, emamectin benzoate 1% EC, permethrin 20% EC, chlorfluazuron 5% EC, flufenoxuron 10% EC, and teflubenzuron 5% EC were found to be selective against the cocoon… Expand
Evaluation of selective toxicity of five pesticides against Plutella xylostella (Lep: Plutellidae) and their side-effects against Cotesia plutellae (Hym: Braconidae) and Oomyzus sokolowskii (Hym: Eulophidae).
The toxicities of five pesticides commonly used in vegetable fields to the larvae of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L) and its two major parasitoids, Cotesia plutellae (Kurdjumov) andExpand
Effects of selected insecticides on Cotesia plutellae, endoparasitoid of Plutella xylostella
TLDR
Effects of field dosages of selected insecticides to Cotesiaplutellae (Kurdjumov) (Hymenoptera: Braconidae), a larval endoparasitoid of Plutella xylostella L. (Lepidoptera): Plutellidae were investigated under laboratory conditions, with one exception; femalelongevity was significantly reduced in the indoxacarb treatment. Expand
Assessment of the impact of insecticides on Anagrus nilaparvatae (Pang et Wang) (Hymenoptera: Mymanidae), an egg parasitoid of the rice planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae)
TLDR
Assessment of potential insecticide toxicities to the wasps showed that dichlorvos was the most toxic, which generated 100% mortality only 2 h after treatment, while IGRs showed very low contact and residual toxicity, but exhibited certain chronic effects of oral toxicity on longevity, fecundity, and offspring emergence. Expand
Comparative effects of a selective insecticide, Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki and the broad-spectrum insecticide cypermethrin on diamondback moth and its parasitoid Cotesia vestalis (Hymenoptera; Braconidae)
TLDR
Results demonstrate that Biobit reduces P. xylostella field density and crop damage with minimal impact on the C. vestalis yield loss abatement function. Expand
Effects of the botanical insecticide thymol on biology of a braconid, Cotesia plutellae (Kurdjumov), parasitizing the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella L.
TLDR
Results obtained suggest that parasitoid is able to withstand the impact of thymol significantly, and some biological parameters of the progeny at sublethal doses of surviving parasitoids were impaired such as rate of emergence and development time of larvae and pupae. Expand
Effects of selected insecticides on Diadegma semiclausum (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) and Oomyzus sokolowskii (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), parasitoids of Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae)
TLDR
Field doses of six selected insecticides were tested against the immature and mature stages of Diadegma semiclausum and Oomyzus sokolowskii, parasitoids of the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, and adult mortality of both parasitoid species was 0–16.7%. Expand
Comparative selectivity of pesticides used in greenhouses, on the aphid parasitoid Aphidius colemani (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)
TLDR
Pesticides tested were harmless (<30% mortality) to the parasitoid species tested according to International Organisation for Biological Control toxicity classification and are likely to be compatible with integrated pest management programmes. Expand
Lethal and Sublethal Effects of Conventional and Organic Insecticides on the Parasitoid Trissolcus japonicus, a Biological Control Agent for Halyomorpha halys
The egg parasitoid Trissolcus japonicus is a natural enemy of Halyomorpha halys, a polyphagous invasive pest in Europe and North and South America. Integration of chemical and biological controlExpand
Compatibility of insecticides and Elachertus inunctus Nees (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) for controlling Tuta absoluta Meyrick (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae) in greenhouse condition
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The results suggest that the integration application of Bt with early inundate release of E. innunctus can be recommended for suitable and environmentally safe control of SATP in greenhouse tomato. Expand
The ecological impact of four IGR insecticides in adults of Hyposoter didymator (Hym., Ichneumonidae): pharmacokinetics approach
TLDR
Several mechanisms are likely to be involved in the selectivity of these products towards this parasitoid, with pyriproxyfen and diflubenzuron absorption in the adult body tissues reach >65%, whereas this was only 40% for tebufenozide and methoxyfenozide. Expand
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