Effects of consuming mycoprotein, tofu or chicken upon subsequent eating behaviour, hunger and safety

@article{Williamson2006EffectsOC,
  title={Effects of consuming mycoprotein, tofu or chicken upon subsequent eating behaviour, hunger and safety},
  author={Donald A. Williamson and Paula J. Geiselman and Jennifer C. Lovejoy and Frank L. Greenway and Julia Volaufova and Corby K. Martin and Cheryl Arnett and Lauren E Ortego},
  journal={Appetite},
  year={2006},
  volume={46},
  pages={41-48}
}
Influence of rice, pea and oat proteins in attenuating glycemic response of sugar-sweetened beverages
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Plant proteins altered the glycemic and appetitive responses of Asian males to a sugar-sweetened beverage and food-based interventions are useful in promoting glycemic control.
Mycoprotein represents a bioavailable and insulinotropic non-animal-derived dietary protein source: a dose–response study
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Mycoprotein represents a bioavailable and insulinotropic dietary protein source that may be a useful source of dietary protein to stimulate muscle protein synthesis rates.
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TLDR
The promotion of mycoprotein could potentially be useful, alongside other strategies, in the management of obesity and type 2 diabetes, as it appears to show beneficial effects on glycaemia and insulinaemia in the small number of studies where this has been investigated.
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TLDR
The acute ingestion of mycoprotein reduces energy intake and insulinaemia, whereas its impact on glycaemia is currently unclear, evidence comes from a very limited number of heterogeneous studies.
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D diets varying in protein quantity with either beef/pork or soy/legume as the predominant source have minimal effects on appetite control, energy expenditure and cardio-metabolic risk factors during ER-induced weight loss.
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TLDR
Emerging data suggest that the amino acid composition and bioavailability of mycoprotein may also position it as a promising dietary protein source to support skeletal muscle protein metabolism.
Daily mycoprotein consumption for 1 week does not affect insulin sensitivity or glycaemic control but modulates the plasma lipidome in healthy adults: a randomised controlled trial
Abstract Mycoprotein consumption has been shown to improve acute postprandial glycaemic control and decrease circulating cholesterol concentrations. We investigated the impact of incorporating
The potential role of soyfoods in weight and adiposity reduction: an evidence‐based review
TLDR
Overall, the current data suggest that soyfoods are as good as other protein sources for promoting weight loss and there is a suggestive body of evidence that soyFoods may confer additional benefits, but results must be carefully interpreted and additional evidence is needed before making firm conclusions concerning Soyfoods and weight loss.
How Healthy Are Non-Traditional Dietary Proteins? The Effect of Diverse Protein Foods on Biomarkers of Human Health
TLDR
Human, animal, and in vitro data suggest that non-traditional protein foods have compelling beneficial effects on human health, complementing traditional proteins (meat/poultry, soy, eggs, dairy), and there is a strong need for quality human data from randomized controlled intervention studies.
Mycoprotein reduces energy intake and postprandial insulin release without altering glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide tyrosine-tyrosine concentrations in healthy overweight and obese adults: a randomised-controlled trial
TLDR
Investigation of the effect of mycoprotein on energy intake, appetite regulation, and the metabolic phenotype in overweight and obese volunteers found it reduces energy intake and insulin release in overweight volunteers.
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