Effects of cerebellar neuromodulation in movement disorders: A systematic review

@article{Frana2018EffectsOC,
  title={Effects of cerebellar neuromodulation in movement disorders: A systematic review},
  author={Carina França and Daniel Ciampi de Andrade and Manoel Jacobsen Teixeira and Ricardo Galhardoni and Valquiria A. Silva and Egberto Reis Barbosa and Rubens Gisbert Cury},
  journal={Brain Stimulation},
  year={2018},
  volume={11},
  pages={249-260}
}
Effects of Anodal Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Movements in Patients with Cerebellar Ataxias: A Systematic Review
TLDR
Preliminary evidence that anodal cerebellar tDCS is beneficial to reducing disease severity and improving finger dexterity and quality of life in patients is shown, which lays the groundwork for future studies further examining responses in the cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathway.
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TLDR
There is encouraging evidence for the use of noninvasive stimulation on a subset of symptoms in selected movement disorders, although the means to optimize protocols for improving positive outcomes in routine clinical practice remain undetermined.
The role of the cerebellum in degenerative ataxias and essential tremor: Insights from noninvasive modulation of cerebellar activity
TLDR
The therapeutic potential of Cerebellar noninvasive stimulation techniques in two movement disorders characterized by prominent cerebellar involvement, namely the degenerative ataxias and essential tremor are comprehensively explored.
The effects of transcranial direct current stimulation on gait in patients with Parkinson’s disease: a systematic review
TLDR
Overall, tDCS targeting the motor cortex and supplementary motor area bilaterally seems to be promising for gait rehabilitation in PD, and tDCS addressing the dorosolateral prefrontal cortex or cerebellum showed more heterogeneous results.
A narrative review on non-invasive stimulation of the cerebellum in neurological diseases
TLDR
There are no conclusive data on whether NICS induces meaningful clinical effects from repeated sessions alone in both cerebellar and non-cerebellar diseases, and several concerns need to be still addressed before NICS could be considered a valuable, standard therapeutic tool.
Future of Tanscranial Magnetic Stimulation in Movement Disorders: Introduction of Novel Methods
TLDR
Three new TMS utilities for scientific research or clinical application for movement disorders are presented, including rTMS over the cerebellum, which may enhance functional recovery of the gait more robustly than conventional rehabilitation alone in patients with a spinal cord injury.
Safety of transcranial direct current stimulation in a patient with deep brain stimulation electrodes.
TLDR
The results indicate that tDCS is safe in patients with DBS electrodes and may be an effective add-on neuromodulatory tool in the treatment of potential DBS partial efficacy in Patients with movement disorders.
Consensus Paper: Ataxic Gait.
TLDR
The panel of experts agree that the understanding of the Cerebellar contribution to gait control will lead to a better management of cerebellar ataxias in general and will likely contribute to use gait parameters as robust biomarkers of future clinical trials.
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The results described herein suggest that Purkinje cells or the dentato–thalamo–cortical pathway assessed by CBI is involved in PSP, which is compatible with the pathological findings showing severe dentate nucleus degeneration in PSP patients.
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Background and objectives Cerebellar ataxias are disabling disorders that impact the quality of life of patients. In many cases, an effective treatment is missing. Despite the increasing knowledge on
Cerebellar and Motor Cortical Transcranial Stimulation Decrease Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesias in Parkinson’s Disease
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Preliminary results show that anodal tDCS applied for five consecutive days over the motor cortical areas and cerebellum improves parkinsonian patients’ levodopa-induced dyskinesias.
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Intermittent theta-burst stimulation of the cerebellum may improve cervical dystonia symptoms, upper limb motor control and quality of life and Cerebellar neuromodulation may have potential as a novel treatment intervention for cervical dySTONia, although larger confirmatory studies are required.
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