Effects of buckwheat flowers on leafroller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) parasitoids in a New Zealand vineyard

@article{Berndt2002EffectsOB,
  title={Effects of buckwheat flowers on leafroller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) parasitoids in a New Zealand vineyard},
  author={L. Berndt and S. Wratten and Paul G. Hassan},
  journal={Agricultural and Forest Entomology},
  year={2002},
  volume={4}
}
Abstract 1 The provision of floral resources in agricultural ecosystems can potentially enhance biological control of pests by providing nutrients to parasitoids. To test this, the effect of buckwheat Fagopyrum esculentum Moench flowers on leafroller parasitoids was investigated in a New Zealand vineyard. 
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