Effects of an Invasive Plant Species, Celastrus orbiculatus, on Soil Composition and Processes

@inproceedings{LeichtYoung2009EffectsOA,
  title={Effects of an Invasive Plant Species, Celastrus orbiculatus, on Soil Composition and Processes},
  author={Stacey A. Leicht-Young and H. O'Donnell and A. Latimer and J. Silander},
  year={2009}
}
Abstract Celastrus orbiculatus is a non-native, invasive liana that was introduced to the United States in the 1860s and has spread rapidly throughout the Northeast. Several attributes contribute to the invasiveness of C. orbiculatus, including tolerance to a wide range of light levels and habitat types. We compared soil characteristics in seven sets of adjacent, paired plots, spanning a range of habitats and soil types, with and without C. orbiculatus. The paired plots were similar other than… Expand
Impacts of Celastrus-primed soil on common native and invasive woodland species
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Positive impacts of invaded soils on plant growth are not universal, and the plant community may show a varied response to C. orbiculatus-primed soils depending on the level of resource competition. Expand
Mycorrhizae and soil phosphorus affect growth of Celastrus orbiculatus
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It is suggested that in the presence of mycorrhizae or sufficient phosphorus, C. orbiculatus can respond by preferentially allocating energy to above-ground growth, thus supporting its liana growth form onto trees and allowing the exotic to outcompete native species for light resources. Expand
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Comparison of allelopathic effects of five invasive species on two native species1
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Overall, L. maackii had the strongest effects, followed closely by C. orbiculatus, which was then followed in turn by R. ficaria, providing further support for the allelopathic potential of L. Maackii. Expand
Allee effects and soil nutrient changes mediated by experimental plantings of a nonindigenous, temperate liana
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Evidence of Allee effects combined with wintercreeper’s ability to modify nutrient cycling may help account for this species’ recent recognition as a serious plant-pest following a century of widespread cultivation. Expand
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TLDR
Overall, plant invasions increased N pools and accelerated fluxes, even when excluding N-fixing invaders, and it is shown that more functionally distant invaders occurring in mild climates are causing the strongest alterations to the N cycle. Expand
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The effect of Celastrus orbiculatus, oriental bittersweet, on the herbaceous layer along a western North Carolina creek
TLDR
The results suggest that this species's highly developed morphological and physiological adaptations may allow it to eventually dominate this site, as it is found that bittersweet is negatively affecting the community. Expand
Lianas escape self-thinning: Experimental evidence of positive density dependence in temperate lianas Celastrus orbiculatus and C. scandens
TLDR
This study demonstrates that these lianas can escape the consequences of high density and thus the self-thinning law that affects self-supporting plants, and suggests a broader hypothesis about lianaas in general: their greater flexibility in allocating growth resources allows them to grow taller and thinner without collapsing and thereby potentially escape shading and mortality even at high densities. Expand
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