Effects of a yearlong moderate-intensity exercise and a stretching intervention on sleep quality in postmenopausal women.

@article{Tworoger2003EffectsOA,
  title={Effects of a yearlong moderate-intensity exercise and a stretching intervention on sleep quality in postmenopausal women.},
  author={Shelley S. Tworoger and Yutaka Yasui and M. Vitiello and Robert S. Schwartz and Cornelia M. Ulrich and Erin J. Aiello and Melinda L Irwin and Deborah J. Bowen and John D. Potter and Anne McTiernan},
  journal={Sleep},
  year={2003},
  volume={26 7},
  pages={
          830-6
        }
}
STUDY OBJECTIVES To examine the effects of a moderate-intensity exercise or stretching intervention and changes in fitness, body mass index, or time spent outdoors on self-reported sleep quality and to examine the relationship between the amount and timing of exercise and sleep quality. DESIGN A randomized intervention trial. SETTING A cancer research center in Seattle, Washington. PARTICIPANTS Postmenopausal, overweight or obese, sedentary women not taking hormone replacement therapy… Expand
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