Effects of a large-scale intervention with influenza and 23-valent pneumococcal vaccines in adults aged 65 years or older: a prospective study

@article{Christenson2001EffectsOA,
  title={Effects of a large-scale intervention with influenza and 23-valent pneumococcal vaccines in adults aged 65 years or older: a prospective study},
  author={Brith Christenson and Per Lundbergh and Jonas Hedlund and {\AA}ke {\"O}rtqvist},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2001},
  volume={357},
  pages={1008-1011}
}
Additive preventive effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in elderly persons
TLDR
There was a strong indication that pneumococcal vaccination alone, was effective not only in the prevention of invasive pneumococCal disease, but also of pneumonia overall, although to a low degree.
Effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in elderly persons in years of low influenza activity
TLDR
The additive effect of the two vaccines in the elderly, which was associated with a reduced risk in hospitalisation and a reduction in mean LOHS in seasons with low influenza activity, is confirmed.
Preventive effects of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in the elderly – results from a population-based retrospective cohort study
TLDR
A retrospective cohort study of 138,877 individuals aged ≥60 y in Germany found a rise in influenza-like illness and acute respiratory infections in both years and an increased 90-d mortality after hospital-treated pneumonia in vaccinees in 2015.
Comparison between cohorts vaccinated and unvaccinated against influenza and pneumococcal infection
TLDR
The influenza and pneumococcal-vaccine recipients were older and had significantly more chronic lung and heart conditions than the unvaccinated cohort.
Cost-benefit evaluation of routine influenza immunisation in people 65-74 years of age.
TLDR
The analysis did not suggest that influenza vaccination in healthy people aged 65-74 years would lead to lower NHS costs and future research should look at ways to maximise vaccine uptake in people at greatest risk from influenza and also the level of vaccine protection afforded to people from different age and socio-economic populations.
A cohort study of the effectiveness of influenza vaccine in older people, performed using the United Kingdom general practice research database.
TLDR
Influenza vaccination reduces the number of hospitalizations and deaths due to respiratory disease, after correction for confounding in individuals >64 years of age who had a high risk or a low risk for influenza.
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