Effects of Sequestered Iridoid Glycosides on Prey Choice of the Prairie Wolf Spider, Lycosa carolinensis

@article{Theodoratus2004EffectsOS,
  title={Effects of Sequestered Iridoid Glycosides on Prey Choice of the Prairie Wolf Spider, Lycosa carolinensis},
  author={Demetri Hilario Theodoratus and M. Bowers},
  journal={Journal of Chemical Ecology},
  year={2004},
  volume={25},
  pages={283-295}
}
  • Demetri Hilario Theodoratus, M. Bowers
  • Published 2004
  • Biology
  • Journal of Chemical Ecology
  • Specialist insect herbivores that sequester allelochemicals from their host plants may be unpalatable to potential predators. However, the host-plant species used may determine the degree of palatability. Spiders, including members of the family Lycosidae, are important predators of invertebrate prey. We fed buckeye caterpillars, Junonia coenia (Nymphalidae), reared on Plantago lanceolata (containing high levels of iridoid glycosides) or P. major (containing low levels of iridoid glycosides) to… CONTINUE READING
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