Effects of Season, Temperature, and Body Mass on the Standard Metabolic Rate of Tegu Lizards (Tupinambis merianae)

@article{Toledo2008EffectsOS,
  title={Effects of Season, Temperature, and Body Mass on the Standard Metabolic Rate of Tegu Lizards (Tupinambis merianae)},
  author={Lu{\'i}s Felipe Toledo and Simone Cristina Pereira Brito and William K. Milsom and Augusto Shinya Abe and Denis V. Andrade},
  journal={Physiological and Biochemical Zoology},
  year={2008},
  volume={81},
  pages={158 - 164}
}
This study examined how the standard metabolic rate of tegu lizards, a species that undergoes large ontogenetic changes in body weight with associated changes in life‐history traits, is affected by changes in body mass, body temperature, season, and life‐history traits. We measured rates of oxygen consumption (V̇o2) in 90 individuals ranging in body mass from 10.4 g to 3.75 kg at three experimental temperatures (17°, 25°, and 30°C) over the four seasons. We found that standard metabolic rate… 
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Seasonal Changes in Daily Metabolic Patterns of Tegu Lizards (Tupinambis merianae) Placed in the Cold (17°C) and Dark
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Tegu lizards reduced their metabolism to the low rates seen in winter dormancy at all times of the year when given sufficient time in the cold and dark, suggesting that the temperature‐independent reduction of metabolism was already in place by autumn before the tegus had enteredWinter dormancy.
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