Effects of Random Allocation to Vitamin E Supplementation on the Occurrence of Venous Thromboembolism: Report From the Women’s Health Study

@article{Glynn2007EffectsOR,
  title={Effects of Random Allocation to Vitamin E Supplementation on the Occurrence of Venous Thromboembolism: Report From the Women’s Health Study},
  author={R. Glynn and P. Ridker and S. Goldhaber and R. Zee and J. Buring},
  journal={Circulation},
  year={2007},
  volume={116},
  pages={1497-1503}
}
Background— Supplementation with vitamin E may antagonize vitamin K in healthy adults, but it is unclear whether intake of vitamin E decreases the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Methods and Results— The Women’s Health Study randomized 39 876 women ≥45 years of age to receive 600 IU of natural source vitamin E or placebo on alternate days. Before randomization, 26 779 participants gave blood samples, which were used to determine factor V Leiden, G20210A prothrombin, and 677C>T MTHFR… Expand
Effects of random allocation to vitamin E supplementation on the occurrence of venous thromboembolism: report from the Women's Health Study.
TLDR
It is suggested that supplementation with vitamin E may reduce the risk of VTE in women, and those with a prior history or genetic predisposition may particularly benefit. Expand
Vitamin supplementation on the risk of venous thrombosis: results from the MEGA case-control study.
TLDR
After extensive adjustments, vitamin supplementation was no longer associated with a decreased risk of venous thrombosis in this study, suggesting previous positive results may have been spurious as a result of uncontrolled confounding. Expand
Diet and incident venous thromboembolism: the Iowa Women's Health Study.
TLDR
In this cohort of older women, greater intake of alcohol was associated with a lower risk of incident venous thromboembolism and no other independent associations were seen between diet and VTE. Expand
Exploring Opportunities for Primary Prevention of Unprovoked Venous Thromboembolism: Ready for Prime Time?
TLDR
It is suggested that a reduction of obesity, physical inactivity, current smoking, and Western diet by 25% in the general population might reduce the incidence of unprovoked VTE by 12%. Expand
Vitamin E revisited: do new data validate benefits for chronic disease prevention?
Purpose of review Vitamin E benefits in human health and chronic disease prevention are evaluated with respect to established α-tocopherol functions during vitamin E deficiency, adequacy, and excess.Expand
Letter by Violi and Pignatelli regarding article, "Effects of random allocation to vitamin E supplementation on the occurrence of venous thromboembolism: report from the Women's Health Study".
TLDR
Vitamin E supplementation in healthy women on the assumption that vitamin E possessed antithrombotic properties that could prevent the occurrence of venous thromboembolism was given. Expand
Cardiovascular and Metabolic Protection by Vitamin E: A Matter of Treatment Strategy?
Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) cause about 1/3 of global deaths. Therefore, new strategies for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular events are highly sought-after. Vitamin E is known forExpand
Effects of vitamin E on stroke subtypes: meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials
TLDR
In this meta-analysis, vitamin E increased the risk for haemorrhagic stroke by 22% and reduced the risk of ischaemic stroke by 10% and indiscriminate widespread use of vitamin E should be cautioned against. Expand
Antioxidant supplements for prevention of mortality in healthy participants and patients with various diseases.
TLDR
Primary and secondary prevention randomised clinical trials on antioxidant supplements versus placebo or no intervention found no significant difference in the estimated intervention effect in the primary prevention and the secondary prevention trials, and meta-regression analysis found the risk of bias and type of antioxidant supplement were the only significant predictors of intertrial heterogeneity. Expand
Invited commentary: Diet and risk of venous thromboembolism--a hard nut to crack.
  • P. Lutsey
  • Medicine
  • American journal of epidemiology
  • 2012
TLDR
This commentary discusses the findings of Varraso et al. within the context of the existing literature and posits epidemiologic explanations for why investigators might have failed to identify strong associations between diet and venous thromboembolism. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 39 REFERENCES
Vitamin E in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer: the Women's Health Study: a randomized controlled trial.
TLDR
The data from this large trial indicated that 600 IU of natural-source vitamin E taken every other day provided no overall benefit for major cardiovascular events or cancer, did not affect total mortality, and decreased cardiovascular mortality in healthy women. Expand
MRC/BHF Heart Protection Study of antioxidant vitamin supplementation in 20 536 high-risk individuals: a randomised placebo-controlled trial
TLDR
Among the high-risk individuals that were studied, these antioxidant vitamins appeared to be safe, but, although this regimen increased blood vitamin concentrations substantially, it did not produce any significant reductions in the 5-year mortality from, or incidence of, any type of vascular disease, cancer, or other major outcome. Expand
MRC/BHF Heart Protection Study of antioxidant vitamin supplementation in 20536 high-risk individuals: a randomised placebo-controlled trial
TLDR
Among the high-risk individuals that were studied, these antioxidant vitamins appeared to be safe, but, although this regimen increased blood vitamin concentrations substantially, it did not produce any significant reductions in the 5-year mortality from, or incidence of, any type of vascular disease, cancer, or other major outcome. Expand
Effect of vitamin E supplementation on vitamin K status in adults with normal coagulation status.
TLDR
High-dose vitamin E supplementation increased PIVKA-II in adults not receiving oral anticoagulant therapy, but high doses of vitamin E may antagonize vitamin K. Expand
Randomized trials of vitamin E in the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease.
TLDR
The ORs and CIs provide strong support for a lack of statistically significant or clinically important effects of vitamin E on cardiovascular disease and the use of agents of proven lack of benefit, especially those easily available over the counter, may contribute to underuse of agent of proven benefit and failure to adopt healthy lifestyles. Expand
Low-dose aspirin in the primary prevention of cancer: the Women's Health Study: a randomized controlled trial.
TLDR
Results from this large-scale, long-term trial suggest that alternate day use of low-dose aspirin for an average 10 years of treatment does not lower risk of total, breast, colorectal, or other site-specific cancers. Expand
Cardiovascular risk factors and venous thromboembolism incidence: the longitudinal investigation of thromboembolism etiology.
TLDR
The data showing no relationship of some arterial risk factors with VTE corroborate the view that the etiology of VTE differs from atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and suggest a hypothesis that avoidance of obesity and diabetes or vigilance in prophylaxis in patients with those conditions may prevent some venous thromboses. Expand
β-Carotene Supplementation and Incidence of Cancer and Cardiovascular Disease: the Women's Health Study.
TLDR
There was no benefit or harm from beta-carotene supplementation for a limited period on the incidence of cancer and of cardiovascular disease among apparently healthy women. Expand
Use of antioxidant vitamins for the prevention of cardiovascular disease: meta-analysis of randomised trials
TLDR
The results, combined with the lack of mechanistic data for efficacy of vitamin E, do not support the routine use of vitamins E, and a salutary effect was seen consistently for various doses of vitamins in diverse populations. Expand
Beta-carotene supplementation and incidence of cancer and cardiovascular disease: the Women's Health Study.
TLDR
Among apparently healthy women, there was no benefit or harm from beta-carotene supplementation for a limited period on the incidence of cancer and of cardiovascular disease. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
...