Effects of Raloxifene, a Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator, on Bone Turnover Markers and Serum Sex Steroid and Lipid Levels in Elderly Men

@article{Doran2001EffectsOR,
  title={Effects of Raloxifene, a Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator, on Bone Turnover Markers and Serum Sex Steroid and Lipid Levels in Elderly Men},
  author={Patrick M. Doran and B Lawrence Riggs and Elizabeth J. Atkinson and Sundeep Khosla},
  journal={Journal of Bone and Mineral Research},
  year={2001},
  volume={16}
}
Several lines of evidence implicate estrogen deficiency as a cause of bone loss in elderly men. Thus, in 50 elderly men (mean age ± SD, 69.1 ± 6.0 years), we performed a randomized blinded study to assess the effect of 6 months of treatment with 60 mg/day of raloxifene (a selective estrogen receptor modulator [SERM] that has an agonist effect on bone but is not feminizing) versus placebo on bone turnover markers. The mean changes in bone turnover markers, serum sex steroid, or lipid levels with… 
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