Effects of Mechanical Stimulation on the Biomechanics of Stem Cell - Collagen Sponge Constructs for Patellar Tendon Repair

  • Juncosa - Melvin
  • Published 2005

Abstract

Introduction. Tendons (rotator cuff, Achilles and patellar tendons) are among the most commonly injured soft tissues [1]. Many repairs/reconstructions have been attempted (e.g. sutures, resorbable biomaterials, autografts, and allografts) with varying success. A tissue engineered repair using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is attractive [25] but tissue stiffness and strength need to be improved [6]. The current study was undertaken to determine how mechanical stimulation in culture of MSC-type I collagen sponge constructs affect the biomechanics and histology of rabbit patellar tendon (PT) defect repairs 12 weeks after surgery. The hypotheses to be tested were that mechanical stimulation would: 1) significantly improve repair biomechanics and histological appearance, 2) result in higher failure forces than measured in vivo forces in normal rabbit PT during an inclined hopping activity [7], and 3) result in repairs that match the tangent stiffness of normal PT above these peak in vivo forces.

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Melvin2005EffectsOM, title={Effects of Mechanical Stimulation on the Biomechanics of Stem Cell - Collagen Sponge Constructs for Patellar Tendon Repair}, author={Juncosa - Melvin}, year={2005} }