Effects of Mass and Interpersonal Communication on Breast Cancer Screening: Advancing Agenda-Setting Theory in Health Contexts

@article{Jones2006EffectsOM,
  title={Effects of Mass and Interpersonal Communication on Breast Cancer Screening: Advancing Agenda-Setting Theory in Health Contexts},
  author={Karyn Ogata Jones and Bryan E. Denham and Jeffrey K. Springston},
  journal={Journal of Applied Communication Research},
  year={2006},
  volume={34},
  pages={113 - 94}
}
Drawing on components of agenda-setting theory and the two-step flow of information from mass media to news audiences, this study examines the effects of mass and interpersonal communication on breast cancer screening practices among college- and middle-aged women (n = 284). We theorized that screening behaviors among younger women would be influenced more by interpersonal sources of information while screening among middle-aged women would be more influenced by exposure to mass-mediated… Expand
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