Effects of Lattice Motion on Dissociative Chemisorption: Toward a Rigorous Comparison of Theory with Molecular Beam Experiments.

Abstract

The dissociative chemisorption of small molecules such as methane and water on metal surfaces is a key step in many important catalyzed reactions. However, it has only very recently become possible to directly compare theory with molecular beam studies of these reactions. For most experimental conditions, such a comparison requires accurate methods for introducing the effects of lattice motion into quantum reactive scattering calculations. We examine these methods and their recent application to methane and water dissociative chemisorption. New results are presented for CO2 chemisorption and methane dissociation at step edges. The type of molecule-lattice coupling that leads to a strong variation in the dissociative sticking of methane with temperature is shown to occur for many polyatomic-metal systems. Improvements to these models are discussed. The ability to accurately compare theory with molecular beam experiments should lead to improved density functionals and consequently more accurate thermal rate constants for these important reactions.

Cite this paper

@article{Guo2016EffectsOL, title={Effects of Lattice Motion on Dissociative Chemisorption: Toward a Rigorous Comparison of Theory with Molecular Beam Experiments.}, author={Han Guo and Azar Farjamnia and Bret Jackson}, journal={The journal of physical chemistry letters}, year={2016}, volume={7 22}, pages={4576-4584} }