Effects of Gall Induction by Epiblema Strenuana on Gas Exchange, Nutrients, and Energetics in Parthenium Hysterophorus

@article{Florentine2004EffectsOG,
  title={Effects of Gall Induction by Epiblema Strenuana on Gas Exchange, Nutrients, and Energetics in Parthenium Hysterophorus},
  author={S. Florentine and A. Raman and K. Dhileepan},
  journal={BioControl},
  year={2004},
  volume={50},
  pages={787-801}
}
Gall induction by arthropods results in a range of morphological and physiological changes in their host plants. We examined changes in gas exchange, nutrients, and energetics related to the presence of stem galls on Parthenium hysterophorus L. (Asteraceae) induced by the moth, Epiblema strenuana Walker (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). We compared the effects of galls on P. hysterophorus in the rosette (young), pre-flowering (mature), and flowering (old) stages. Gall induction reduced the leaf-water… Expand

Figures and Tables from this paper

Photosynthesis and sink activity of wasp-induced galls in Acacia pycnantha.
TLDR
The ability of the wasps to cause gall formation in vegetative tissues tempers intraspecific competition and substantially increases the availability of plant resources for the development of wasps in such galls is concluded. Expand
Sink Status and Photosynthetic Rate of the Leaflet Galls Induced by Bystracoccus mataybae (Eriococcidae) on Matayba guianensis (Sapindaceae)
TLDR
It is hypothesized that high levels of nutrients are accumulated during gall development in response to a local maintenance of photosynthesis and to the galling insect activity, and to supply the demands of gall metabolism, the levels of water-soluble polysaccharides and starch increase in gall tissues. Expand
Structural, histochemical and photosynthetic profiles of galls induced by Eugeniamyia dispar (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae) on the leaves of Eugenia uniflora (Myrtaceae).
TLDR
Despite structural changes, the galls induced by E. dispar on E. uniflora retain chlorophyllous tissue, although its amount and photosynthetic activity are less than that of non-galled leaves. Expand
Metabolite mobilization in the stem galls of Parthenium hysterophorus induced by Epiblema strenuana inferred from the signatures of isotopic carbon and nitrogen and concentrations of total non‐structural carbohydrates
TLDR
Determinations of total non‐structural carbohydrates (TNC) levels and carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of fixed products in different parts of the plant tissue, including the gall, have been made to establish the function of gall as a sink for the nutrients. Expand
Photochemical performance and source-sink relationships in galls induced by Pseudophacopteron longicaudatum (Hemiptera) on leaves of Aspidosperma tomentosum (Apocynaceae)
The establishment of the galling insect generates a biotic stress that leads to tissue transformation. However, galls can maintain chlorophyll (Chl) and consequently photosynthesize. Herein, weExpand
Source-sink relationship and photosynthesis in the horn-shaped gall and its host plant Copaifera langsdorffii Desf. (Fabaceae)
TLDR
The reduced intercellular spaces on the horn-shaped gall structure imply little gas exchange and, thus, hypoxic conditions on the gall tissues, so the incipient photosynthesis might be important to provide oxygen to the structure and avoid hypoxia, enabling gall metabolism. Expand
Leaf-derived cecidomyiid galls are sinks in Machilus thunbergii (Lauraceae) leaves.
TLDR
Results strongly indicate that leaf-derived cecidomyiid galls are sinks in Machilus thunbergii leaves, however, it is perplexing how larvae cycle and balance CO(2) and O( 2) in gall growth chambers without stomata. Expand
Benefits of photosynthesis for insects in galls
TLDR
It is concluded that, although photosynthesis may contribute to O2 provision, its main role is to reduce the dependence of the insect-induced gall on the host plant for photosynthates, thereby reducing intra-plant, inter-gall competition and enhancing the probability that each gall will reach maturity. Expand
Plant organ abscission and the green island effect caused by a coleopteran’s gall on Miconia cf cinnamomifolia (Melastomataceae): larval survival and mortality factors
TLDR
The adaptive nature of the “ Green Island Effect ” was discussed as a counter-response of gallers to leaf abscission, which is a known plant defense strategy. Expand
Galls induced by Calophya latiforceps (Hemiptera: Calophyidae) reduce leaf performance and growth of Brazilian peppertree
TLDR
Results of these studies suggest that C. latiforceps will negatively affect the growth of the Brazilian peppertree if released in Florida. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 44 REFERENCES
Effects of gall damage by the introduced biocontrol agent Epiblema strenuana (Lep., Tortricidae) on the weed Parthenium hysterophorus (Asteraceae)
Effects of gall damage by the introduced moth Epiblema strenuana on different growth stages of the weed Parthenium hysterophorus was evaluated in a field cage using potted plants with no competitionExpand
Responses of the Weed Parthenium bysterophorus (Asteraceae) to the Stem Gall-inducing Weevil Conotrachelus albocinereus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)
TLDR
The tissue and metabolic responses in P hysterophorus are reported in the context of the biology and feeding behaviour of the weevil Conotrachelus albocinereus Fiedler 1940 in Queensland, Australia. Expand
Qualitative evaluation of damage by Epiblema strenuana (Lepidoptera : Tortricidae) to the weed Parthenium hysterophorus (Asteraceae)
TLDR
The ability of the moth to damage the growth point, phloem, and the associated parenchyma, making them nonfunctional, and induce the plant to lose vigor, indicates that it is a potential biocontrol agent. Expand
Efficacy of the Stem-Galling MothEpiblema strenuanaWalk. (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) as a Biological Control Agent for Ragweed Parthenium (Parthenium hysterophorus L.)
TLDR
A synergistic interaction was detected between plant competition and insect attack, and seed production was reduced by more than expected when these factors were combined. Expand
Response of the weed Parthenium hysterophorus (Asteraceae) to defoliation by the introduced biocontrol agent Zygogramma bicolorata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).
TLDR
In water-stressed plants, the negative effects of defoliation on flower production, leaf production, and plant biomass were more significant when defoliated at flowering stage than at early stages of plant growth. Expand
Increased photosynthesis and water potentials in Silphium integrifolium galled by cynipid wasps
TLDR
Evidence is presented that cynipid wasp galls formed by Antistrophus silphii on Silphium integrifolium increase photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (g), and xylem water potential (Ψ) and it is argued that increased A is an ineffective way for silphium to compensate for negative effects of gall insect attack. Expand
Manipulation of food resources by a gall-forming aphid: the physiology of sink-source interactions
TLDR
The capacity of the galling aphid, Pemphigus betae, to manipulate the sink-source translocation patterns of its host, narrowleaf cottonwood, was examined, showing that P. betae galls functioned as physiologic sinks, drawing in resources from surrounding plant sources. Expand
Morphometric relationships and energy allocation in the apical rosette galls of Solidago altissima (Asteraceae) induced by Rhopalomyia solidaginis (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae)
TLDR
It is found that the normal stem diameter, a measure of host-plant vigor, is a predictor of gallmaker performance and the strong relationship between the number of larval chambers and the gall stem diameter indicated the stimulation of the goldenrod genotype to create a strong resource base for accommodating the gall. Expand
Developmental morphology of the gall of Urophora cardui (Diptera, Tephritidae) in the stems of Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense)
TLDR
Four phases in gall development are identified: initiation, growth, maturation, and dehiscence; developmental studies utilizing insect-induced galls may increase the understanding of normal plant growth and development. Expand
Effects of insect damage on photosynthesis, transpiration and SO2 uptake by sycamore
TLDR
The physiological effects of leafhopper feeding are greater than the visible damage suggests and the effects are particularly serious when the damage is fresh, again most marked whenDamage is fresh. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...