Effects of Evidence on Attitudes: Is Polarization the Norm?

@article{Kuhn1996EffectsOE,
  title={Effects of Evidence on Attitudes: Is Polarization the Norm?},
  author={Deanna Kuhn and Joseph R. Lao},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={1996},
  volume={7},
  pages={115 - 120}
}
A 1979 study by Lord, Ross, and Lepper has been widely cited as showing that examination of mixed evidence on a topic leads to polarization of attitudes The polarization phenomenon, we suggest, in fact encompasses two distinct change patterns—a shift from an initially moderate to a more extreme position (regarded here as genuine polarization) and a shift from an initially neutral to a moderate position (which might better be termed “articulating a position”) The findings reported here indicate… 
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