Effects of Egg Consumption on Blood Lipids: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials

@article{Rouhani2018EffectsOE,
  title={Effects of Egg Consumption on Blood Lipids: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials},
  author={Mohammad Hossein Rouhani and Nafiseh Rashidi-Pourfard and Amin Salehi-abargouei and Majid Pour Karimi and Fahimeh Haghighatdoost},
  journal={Journal of the American College of Nutrition},
  year={2018},
  volume={37},
  pages={110 - 99}
}
ABSTRACT Background: It is widely agreed that egg consumption only modestly influences serum lipid concentrations. However, there is no meta-analysis summarizing existing randomized controlled trials. Objective: The purpose of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis of published randomized controlled trials to explore the quantitative effect of egg consumption on serum lipid concentrations. Design: Online databases including MEDLINE, Proquest and Google Scholar were systematically searched… 
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