Effects of Different Volume-Equated Resistance Training Loading Strategies on Muscular Adaptations in Well-Trained Men

@article{Schoenfeld2014EffectsOD,
  title={Effects of Different Volume-Equated Resistance Training Loading Strategies on Muscular Adaptations in Well-Trained Men},
  author={Brad Jon Schoenfeld and Nicholas A Ratamess and Mark D. Peterson and Bret Contreras and Gul Tiryaki Sonmez and Brent A. Alvar},
  journal={Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research},
  year={2014},
  volume={28},
  pages={2909–2918}
}
Abstract Schoenfeld, BJ, Ratamess, NA, Peterson, MD, Contreras, B, Sonmez, GT, and Alvar, BA. Effects of different volume-equated resistance training loading strategies on muscular adaptations in well-trained men. J Strength Cond Res 28(10): 2909–2918, 2014—Regimented resistance training has been shown to promote marked increases in skeletal muscle mass. Although muscle hypertrophy can be attained through a wide range of resistance training programs, the principle of specificity, which states… 

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