Effects of Cannabis Use on Human Behavior, Including Cognition, Motivation, and Psychosis: A Review.

@article{Volkow2016EffectsOC,
  title={Effects of Cannabis Use on Human Behavior, Including Cognition, Motivation, and Psychosis: A Review.},
  author={N. Volkow and J. Swanson and A. Evins and L. DeLisi and M. Meier and R. Gonzalez and M. Bloomfield and H. Curran and R. Baler},
  journal={JAMA psychiatry},
  year={2016},
  volume={73 3},
  pages={
          292-7
        }
}
With a political debate about the potential risks and benefits of cannabis use as a backdrop, the wave of legalization and liberalization initiatives continues to spread. Four states (Colorado, Washington, Oregon, and Alaska) and the District of Columbia have passed laws that legalized cannabis for recreational use by adults, and 23 others plus the District of Columbia now regulate cannabis use for medical purposes. These policy changes could trigger a broad range of unintended consequences… Expand
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