Effects of Body Mass and Temperature on Standard Metabolic Rate in the Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus)

@article{Dorcas2004EffectsOB,
  title={Effects of Body Mass and Temperature on Standard Metabolic Rate in the Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus)},
  author={Michael E. Dorcas and William A. Hopkins and J H Roe},
  journal={Copeia},
  year={2004},
  volume={2004},
  pages={145 - 151}
}
Abstract Determining the consequences of body size and body temperature (Tb) variation is critical to understanding many aspects of snake ecology, because size and temperature play such important roles in the biology of ectotherms. Here, we investigate the effects of body size and temperature variation on the energetics of the largest species of rattlesnake, the Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnake (Crotalus adamanteus). Specifically, we measured oxygen consumption to estimate the standard metabolic… Expand
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