Effectiveness of subcutaneous immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma: A Systematic Review

@article{Erekosima2014EffectivenessOS,
  title={Effectiveness of subcutaneous immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma: A Systematic Review},
  author={Nkiruka Erekosima and Catalina Suarez-Cuervo and Murugappan Ramanathan and Julia M. Kim and Yohalakshmi Chelladurai and Jodi B Segal and Sandra Y. Lin},
  journal={The Laryngoscope},
  year={2014},
  volume={124}
}
To systematically review the effectiveness and safety of subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) for treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma, using formulations currently approved in the United States. 
Efficacy and Safety of Subcutaneous and Sublingual Immunotherapy for Allergic Rhinoconjunctivitis and Asthma.
TLDR
The use of subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy in the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma is discussed and the current evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of both formulations is reviewed. Expand
Subcutaneous immunotherapy
Allergic rhinitis, asthma, and Hymenoptera sensitivity affect approximately 20%, 9%, and 0.66% to 3.3% of adults in the United States, respectively. Various environmental control measures andExpand
The European Survey on Adverse Systemic Reactions in Allergen Immunotherapy (EASSI): A paediatric assessment
Safety data on ‘real‐life’ allergen immunotherapy (AIT) in children and adolescents is usually extrapolated from studies in adults.
Clinical effects of Chinese herbal medicine for allergic rhinitis: reviews of classical and modern literature
TLDR
The mainstay treatment for allergic rhinitis is corticosteroids with a history of prior history of Crohn’s disease and known side effects including nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea. Expand
Distinct modulation of allergic T cell responses by subcutaneous vs. sublingual allergen‐specific immunotherapy
TLDR
Allergen‐specific immunotherapy is the only curative treatment for type I allergy and can be administered subcutaneously or sublingually, but potential differences in the immunological mechanisms involved have not been fully explored. Expand
Subcutaneous Immunotherapy and Sublingual Immunotherapy: Comparative Efficacy, Current and Potential Indications, and Warnings--United States Versus Europe.
TLDR
Subcutaneous immunotherapy and sublingual immunotherapy are effective for allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma and with some support for use in selected patients with atopic dermatitis, but there are differences between the two approaches. Expand
Effectiveness of subcutaneous versus sublingual immunotherapy for allergic rhinitis: current update
TLDR
The four systematic reviews identified in this update demonstrate that SCIT is better than SLIT in reducing symptoms of allergic rhinitis and rescue medication use in adults and children, and there was no difference between the two forms of immunotherapy in reducing combined symptom–medication scores and improving quality of life. Expand
Immunotherapy in allergic rhinitis and lower airway outcomes
TLDR
A critical overview of the current knowledge on the effectiveness of AIT and its potential role in secondary prevention of respiratory allergy progression is provided. Expand
Use of allergen immunotherapy for treatment of allergic conjunctivitis
TLDR
Both SCIT and SLIT offers improvement in allergic conjunctival symptom scores and decrease medication utilization, and cost–benefit analyses tend to favor SCIT (greater efficacy and less impacted by discontinuation rates). Expand
Allergen immunotherapy for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: a systematic overview of systematic reviews
TLDR
Moderate-to-strong evidence is found that SCIT and SLIT can, in appropriately selected patients, reduce symptoms and medication requirements in patients with ARC with reassuring safety data. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 78 REFERENCES
Usefulness of specific immunotherapy in patients with severe perennial allergic rhinitis induced by house dust mite: a double‐blind, randomized, placebo‐controlled trial
Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of specific immunotherapy (SIT) in patients with severe house dust mite (HDM)‐induced perennial allergic rhinitis using diary cards and objective endpoints.
Efficacy and safety of subcutaneous immunotherapy with a biologically standardized extract of Ambrosia artemisiifolia pollen: a double‐blind, placebo‐controlled study
  • C. Mirone, F. Albert, +6 authors C. Ortolani
  • Medicine
  • Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology
  • 2004
TLDR
The efficacy of the injective immunotherapy for this allergen has been documented only in Northern America and it is unclear whether this data can be generalized to Europe. Expand
Effect of immunotherapy on asthma progression, BHR and sputum eosinophils in allergic rhinitis
Background:  Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) and airway inflammation are frequently associated with allergic rhinitis, and may be important risk factors for the development of asthma. SpecificExpand
A double‐blind, placebo‐controlled study of house dust mite immunotherapy in Chinese asthmatic patients
TLDR
If house dust mite immunotherapy with Alutard SQ is effective in improving symptom control and reducing rescue medication use in Chinese patients with mild to moderate allergic asthma is determined. Expand
Clinical efficacy of specific immunotherapy to cat dander: a double‐blind placebo‐controlled trial
Objectives To assess the efficacy of specific immunotherapy with standardized cat dander extract, using objective endpoints and simulated ‘natural’ exposure to cats.
An update on the safety of specific immunotherapy
TLDR
If both forms of therapy are equally effective, a cost-benefit analysis of sublingual immunotherapy versus subcutaneous immunotherapy is necessary to determine how best to incorporate both form of specific immunotherapy into the management of allergic patients. Expand
Immunotherapy with a calcium phosphate‐adsorbed five‐grass‐pollen extract in seasonal rhinoconjunctivitis: a double‐blind, placebo‐controlled study
  • F. Leynadier, L. Banoun, +7 authors C. André
  • Medicine
  • Clinical and experimental allergy : journal of the British Society for Allergy and Clinical Immunology
  • 2001
Background Calcium phosphate‐adsorbed allergen extracts are used for subcutaneous immunotherapy to avoid the use of aluminium adjuvants.
Immunotherapy for mountain cedar pollinosis. A double-blind controlled study.
TLDR
Patients treated with specific injection therapy for allergic rhinitis or asthma were found to have significantly fewer symptoms than those who received placebo injections. Expand
Subcutaneous immunotherapy and pharmacotherapy in seasonal allergic rhinitis: a comparison based on meta-analyses.
BACKGROUND Allergen-specific subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) of seasonal allergic rhinitis (SAR) is usually considered a "second-line," slow-acting, disease-modifying treatment. OBJECTIVE WeExpand
Efficacy and safety of specific immunotherapy with SQ allergen extract in treatment-resistant seasonal allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.
TLDR
One season of immunotherapy with Alutard grass pollen reduced symptoms and medication use and improved the quality of life of subjects with moderately severe hay fever. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...