Effectiveness of interventions for reducing non-occupational sedentary behaviour in adults and older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis

@article{Shrestha2018EffectivenessOI,
  title={Effectiveness of interventions for reducing non-occupational sedentary behaviour in adults and older adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis},
  author={Nipun Shrestha and Jozo Grgic and Glen H. Wiesner and Alexandra G. Parker and Hrvoje Podnar and Jason A. Bennie and Stuart J. H. Biddle and Željko Pedi{\vs}i{\'c}},
  journal={British Journal of Sports Medicine},
  year={2018},
  volume={53},
  pages={1206 - 1213}
}
Background No systematic reviews of the effectiveness of interventions for reducing non-occupational sedentary behaviour are available. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of interventions for reducing non-occupational sedentary behaviour in adults and older adults. Methods An electronic search of nine databases was performed. Randomised controlled trials (RCT) and cluster RCTs among adults testing the effectiveness of interventions aimed to reduce non… 
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Interventions for reducing sedentary behaviour in community-dwelling older adults.
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