Effectiveness of corticosteroid treatment in acute pharyngitis: a systematic review of the literature.

@article{Wing2010EffectivenessOC,
  title={Effectiveness of corticosteroid treatment in acute pharyngitis: a systematic review of the literature.},
  author={Andrew Wing and Cristina Villa‐Roel and Benson Yeh and Barnet Eskin and Jeanette Buckingham and Brian H. Rowe},
  journal={Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine},
  year={2010},
  volume={17 5},
  pages={
          476-83
        }
}
  • A. WingC. Villa‐Roel B. Rowe
  • Published 1 May 2010
  • Medicine
  • Academic emergency medicine : official journal of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine
OBJECTIVES The objective was to examine the effectiveness of corticosteroid treatment for the relief of pain associated with acute pharyngitis potentially caused by group A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus (GABHS). METHODS This was a systematic review of the literature. Data sources used were electronic databases (Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, Biosis Previews, Scopus, and Web of Science), controlled trial registration websites, conference proceedings, study references, experts in the field… 

Corticosteroids for treatment of sore throat: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials

Single low dose corticosteroids can provide pain relief in patients with sore throat, with no increase in serious adverse effects.

No evidence for the effectiveness of systemic corticosteroids in acute pharyngitis, community-acquired pneumonia and acute otitis media

Overall, the data showed that there is, currently, no indication for the universal use of systemic corticosteroids in any of the reviewed diseases and, further, high-quality studies of all of these respiratory tract infections are needed in order to identify the patients for whom the prescription of cortICosteroids is rationally acceptable.

Corticosteroids as standalone or add-on treatment for sore throat.

Oral or intramuscular corticosteroids, in addition to antibiotics, moderately increased the likelihood of both resolution and improvement of pain in participants with sore throat and assessed as moderate quality evidence.

Corticosteroids as standalone or add-on treatment for sore throat.

Oral or intramuscular corticosteroids, in addition to antibiotics, increase the likelihood of both resolution and improvement of pain in participants with sore throat, although significant heterogeneity was present.

Dexamethasone as Adjuvant Treatment in Patients with Acute Severe Pharyngitis: A Descriptive Study at Welcare Hospital Emergency Unit, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

It is suggested that dexamethasone is safe and effective to use as adjuvant for management of pain associated with acute GABHS pharyngitis and almost all patients experienced significant pain relief by 36 and 48 hours.

Are corticosteroids an effective treatment of sore throat?

Corticosteroids administered with antibiotics for acute pharyngitis decrease the time to onset of pain relief by approximately 6 hours compared with antibiotics alone.

Corticosteroids for sore throat: a clinical practice guideline

The infographic provides the recommendation together with an overview of the absolute benefits and harms of corticosteroids in the standard GRADE format and any evidence that has emerged since the publication of this article.

27 Pharyngitis

27 Pharyngitis

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 25 REFERENCES

Corticosteroids for pain relief in sore throat: systematic review and meta-analysis

Corticosteroids provide symptomatic relief of pain in sore throat, in addition to antibiotic therapy, mainly in participants with severe or exudative sore throat.

Adjuvant prednisone therapy in pharyngitis: a randomised controlled trial from general practice.

Short-acting oral steroid therapy is effective for shortening throat pain duration in acute pharyngitis and experienced more rapid throat pain resolution than those in the placebo group.

Effectiveness of oral dexamethasone in the treatment of moderate to severe pharyngitis in children.

Children with moderate to severe pharyngitis had earlier onset of pain relief and shorter duration of sore throat when given oral dexamethasone, according to a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

The role of betamethasone in the treatment of acute exudative pharyngitis.

Pain relief was greater and more rapid in patients treated with betamethasone as an adjuvant therapy in acute exudative pharyngitis.

A randomized clinical trial of oral versus intramuscular delivery of steroids in acute exudative pharyngitis.

The results of this clinical trial suggest that oral steroid and IM steroid provide similar levels of pain relief in acute exudative pharyngitis.

Oral dexamethasone for the treatment of pain in children with acute pharyngitis: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

For all children with acute pharyngitis, oral dexamethasone does not decrease the time to onset of clinically significant pain relief or time to complete pain relief, but in the subset of children with positive antigen detection test results, there is a statistically significant improvement in time to start of pain relief.

How effective are treatments other than antibiotics for acute sore throat?

Some non-antibiotic treatments may be more effective than antibiotics and should be investigated further with respect to efficacy, safety, and side-effects as potential firstline management options for acute sore throat.

A Pilot Study of 1 versus 3 Days of Dexamethasone as Add-On Therapy in Children With Streptococcal Pharyngitis

In this pilot study, children with GABHS pharyngitis who receive dexamethasone as add-on therapy have a more rapid improvement in general condition and level of activity and, for those receiving 3 daily doses of dexamETHasone, in resolution of throat pain.