Effectiveness and acceptability of non‐pharmacological interventions to reduce wandering in dementia: a systematic review

@article{Robinson2007EffectivenessAA,
  title={Effectiveness and acceptability of non‐pharmacological interventions to reduce wandering in dementia: a systematic review},
  author={Louise Robinson and Deborah Hutchings and Heather Olivia Dickinson and Lynne Corner and Fiona R Beyer and Tracy L. Finch and Julian C. Hughes and A Vanoli and Clive G Ballard and John Ba Bond},
  journal={International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry},
  year={2007},
  volume={22}
}
Wandering occurs in 15–60% of people with dementia. Psychosocial interventions rather than pharmacological methods are recommended, but evidence for their effectiveness is limited and there are ethical concerns associated with some non‐pharmacological approaches, such as electronic tracking devices. 
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