Effect of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy on neonatal mineral homeostasis and anthropometry of the newborn and infant.

@article{Kalra2012EffectOV,
  title={Effect of vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy on neonatal mineral homeostasis and anthropometry of the newborn and infant.},
  author={Pramila Kalra and Vinita Das and Anjoo Agarwal and Mala Kumar and V Ramesh and Eesh Bhatia and Sarika Gupta and Swati Singh and Priya Saxena and Vijayalakshmi Bhatia},
  journal={The British journal of nutrition},
  year={2012},
  volume={108 6},
  pages={
          1052-8
        }
}
Hypovitaminosis D is common in India. In the present prospective partially randomised study of vitamin D (D₃) supplementation during pregnancy, subjects were randomised in the second trimester to receive either one oral dose of 1500 μg vitamin D₃ (group 1, n 48) or two doses of 3000 μg vitamin D₃ each in the second and third trimesters (group 2, n 49). Maternal 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) at term, cord blood (CB) alkaline phosphatase (ALP), neonatal serum Ca and anthropometry were measured in… 

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