Effect of timing of umbilical cord clamping of term infants on maternal and neonatal outcomes.

@article{McDonald2013EffectOT,
  title={Effect of timing of umbilical cord clamping of term infants on maternal and neonatal outcomes.},
  author={Susan J. McDonald and Philippa F Middleton and Therese Dowswell and Peter Stanley Morris},
  journal={The Cochrane database of systematic reviews},
  year={2013},
  volume={7},
  pages={
          CD004074
        }
}
BACKGROUND Policies for timing of cord clamping vary, with early cord clamping generally carried out in the first 60 seconds after birth, whereas later cord clamping usually involves clamping the umbilical cord more than one minute after the birth or when cord pulsation has ceased. The benefits and potential harms of each policy are debated. OBJECTIVES To determine the effects of early cord clamping compared with late cord clamping after birth on maternal and neonatal outcomes SEARCH… 
Effect of Early Versus Late Umbilical Cord Clamping of Term Infants on Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes
TLDR
Delaying clamping of the cord for more than one minute to three minutes seems not to increase the risk of postpartum hemorrhage and late cord clamping can be advantageous for the infant by improving hematological values especially the status which may be of clinical value particularly in developing countries where infants access to good nutrition is poor.
Effect of timing of umbilical cord clamping and other strategies to influence placental transfusion at preterm birth on maternal and infant outcomes.
TLDR
Providing additional placental blood to the preterm baby by either delaying cord clamping for 30 to 120 seconds, rather than early clamping, seems to be associated with less need for transfusion, better circulatory stability, less intraventricular haemorrhage (all grades) and lower risk for necrotising enterocolitis.
Effect of timing of umbilical cord clamping and other strategies to influence placental transfusion at preterm birth on maternal and infant outcomes.
TLDR
This Cochrane Review is a further update of a review first published in 2004 and updated in 2012 and includes forty-eight studies, with data available from 40 studies involving 4884 babies and their mothers.
Effects of Delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping On Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes in IRRUA : A Randomized Controlled ( Open Label ) Trial
TLDR
Assessment of maternal and neonatal outcomes of delayed versus early umbilical cord clamping in Irrua specialist teaching hospital finds evidence favours delayed Umbilical Cord Clamping as it is beneficial with potential minimal or no risk to the mother and the baby.
Delayed cord clamping and improved infant outcomes
TLDR
In a linked randomised trial, Andersson and colleagues compare the effects of early versus delayed cord clamping on infant iron status at 4 months of age in a European setting and find early clamping is more beneficial than delayed clamping.
Timing of cord clamping in very preterm infants: more evidence is needed.
Effect of Early versus Late Cord Clamping of Term Infants on Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes
TLDR
Delayed cord clamping improves neonatal hemoglobin and ferritin levels without causing any harm to maternal or neonatal outcomes and doesn't increase postpartum hemorrhage or duration of third stage of labour.
Delayed cord clamping does not affect umbilical cord blood gas analysis
TLDR
In this study, infants selected for the DCC procedure were found to be overall lower risk than those delivered as per the standard ECC procedure, and therefore, no adjustment to clinical reference intervals is needed for DCC blood gas samples taken after a 1-min delay period.
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References

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Effect of timing of umbilical cord clamping of term infants on maternal and neonatal outcomes.
TLDR
There were no significant differences between early versus late cord clamping groups for the primary outcome of severe postpartum haemorrhage or for most other neonatal morbidity outcomes, such as Apgar score less than seven at five minutes or admission to the special care nursery or neonatal intensive care unit.
Early versus delayed umbilical cord clamping in preterm infants.
TLDR
Delaying cord clamping by 30 to 120 seconds, rather than early clamping, seems to be associated with less need for transfusion and less intraventricular haemorrhage, and there are no clear differences in other outcomes.
Effect of timing of umbilical cord clamping and other strategies to influence placental transfusion at preterm birth on maternal and infant outcomes.
TLDR
Providing additional placental blood to the preterm baby by either delaying cord clamping for 30 to 120 seconds, rather than early clamping, seems to be associated with less need for transfusion, better circulatory stability, less intraventricular haemorrhage (all grades) and lower risk for necrotising enterocolitis.
Late vs early clamping of the umbilical cord in full-term neonates: systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials.
TLDR
Delaying clamping of the umbilical cord in full-term neonates for a minimum of 2 minutes following birth is beneficial to the newborn, extending into infancy, and there was an increase in polycythemia among infants in whom cord clamping was delayed, which appeared to be benign.
The effect of timing of cord clamping on neonatal venous hematocrit values and clinical outcome at term: a randomized, controlled trial.
TLDR
Delayed cord clamping at birth increases neonatal mean venous hematocrit within a physiologic range and seems to reduce the rate of neonatal anemia, and should be implemented to increase neonatal iron storage at birth.
Effect of Timing of Cord Clamping on Neonatal Venous Hematocrit Values and Clinical Outcome at Term: A Randomized, Controlled Trial
TLDR
Delayed cord clamping at birth increases neonatal mean venous hematocrit within a physiologic range and seems to reduce the rate of neonatal anemia.
Effect of delayed versus early umbilical cord clamping on neonatal outcomes and iron status at 4 months: a randomised controlled trial
TLDR
Delayed cord clamping appears to benefit full term infants even in regions with a relatively low prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia, as iron deficiency in infants even without anaemia has been associated with impaired development.
A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of a Brief Delay in Clamping the Umbilical Cord of Preterm Infants
TLDR
The procedure of a delayed cord clamping time of at least 30 s is safe to use and does not compromise the preterm infant in the initial post-partum adaptation phase.
Current best evidence: a review of the literature on umbilical cord clamping.
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The Early Effects of Delayed Cordc Clamping in Term Infants Born to Libyan Mothers
TLDR
Delaying cord clamping until the pulsations stop increases the red cell mass in term infants, and it is a safe, simple and low cost delivery procedure that should be incorporated in integrated programmes aimed at reducing iron deficiency anaemia in infants in developing countries.
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