Effect of smoke-free legislation on perinatal and child health: a systematic review and meta-analysis

@article{Been2014EffectOS,
  title={Effect of smoke-free legislation on perinatal and child health: a systematic review and meta-analysis},
  author={Jasper V. Been and Ulugbek Nurmatov and Bianca Cox and Tim S. Nawrot and Constant Paul van Schayck and Aziz Sheikh},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2014},
  volume={383},
  pages={1549-1560}
}
Tobacco control policies and perinatal and child health: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol
TLDR
This work aims to comprehensively assess the effects of the range of tobacco control policies advocated by the WHO on perinatal and child health, and to explore the impact of each policy according to socioeconomic status.
Tobacco control policies and perinatal health: a national quasi-experimental study
TLDR
A reduction in SGA births, but not preterm birth or perinatal mortality, was observed in the Netherlands after extension of the smoke-free workplace law to bars and restaurants in conjunction with a tax increase and mass media campaign.
Impact of expanding smoke-free policies beyond enclosed public places and workplaces on children’s tobacco smoke exposure and respiratory health: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis
TLDR
This review will inform policymakers regarding the implementation of extended smoke-free policies to safeguard children’s health and hand-search references and citations to identify additional published and unpublished studies.
Smoke-free legislation and child health
TLDR
An overview of the scientific literature on the link between smoke-free legislation and early-life health outcomes is presented, finding a substantial decrease in the number of perinatal deaths, preterm births and hospital attendance for respiratory tract infections and asthma in children, although such benefits are not found in each study.
Impact of smoke-free legislation on perinatal and infant mortality: a national quasi-experimental study
TLDR
Using a counterfactual scenario, it is estimated that in the first four years following smoke-free legislation, 991 stillbirths, 5,470 cases of low birth weight, and 430 neonatal deaths were prevented.
Impact of institutional smoking bans on reducing harms and secondhand smoke exposure.
TLDR
This review assesses evidence for meso- or organisational-level tobacco control bans or policies in a number of specialist settings, including public healthcare facilities, higher education and correctional facilities, to assess the extent to which institutional smoking bans may reduce passive smoke exposure and active smoking, and affect other health-related outcomes.
Protective Effects of Smoke-free Legislation on Birth Outcomes in England: A Regression Discontinuity Design
TLDR
The introduction of smoke-free legislation in England had an immediate estimated beneficial impact on birth outcomes overall, although it did not observe improvements across all age, ethnic, or deprivation groups.
The impact of smoke-free legislation on educational differences in birth outcomes
TLDR
Smoke-free legislation in Quebec was associated with reductions in preterm and small-for-gestational-age births, and an increase in birth weight, and there was no compelling evidence that legislation impacted educational gradients in birth outcomes.
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References

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The impact of smoke-free legislation on fetal, infant and child health: a systematic review and meta-analysis protocol
TLDR
This work aims to comprehensively assess the impact of smoke-free legislation on fetal, infant and childhood outcomes, and to inform further development and implementation of global policy and strategies to reduce early life SHS exposure.
Environmental tobacco smoke and fetal health: systematic review and meta-analysis
TLDR
Exposure of non-smoking pregnant women to ETS reduces mean birth weight by 33 g or more, and increases the risk of birth weight below 2500 g by 22%, but has no clear effect on gestation or therisk of being small for gestational age.
Prenatal and Passive Smoke Exposure and Incidence of Asthma and Wheeze: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
TLDR
Building upon previous findings, exposure to passive smoking increases the incidence of wheeze and asthma in children and young people by at least 20%.
Meta-analysis of the association between secondhand smoke exposure and physician-diagnosed childhood asthma.
TLDR
There is now consistent evidence of a modest association between secondhand smoke and physician-diagnosed childhood asthma, and these results lend support to continued efforts to reduce childhood exposure to second hand smoke.
Environmental tobacco smoke exposure and perinatal outcomes: a systematic review and meta‐analyses
TLDR
ETS‐exposed women have increased risks of infants with lower birthweight, congenital anomalies, longer lengths, and trends towards smaller head circumferences and LBW.
Association Between Smoke-Free Legislation and Hospitalizations for Cardiac, Cerebrovascular, and Respiratory Diseases: A Meta-Analysis
TLDR
Smoke-free legislation was associated with a lower risk of smoking-related cardiac, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases, with more comprehensive laws associated with greater changes in risk.
Smoke-free legislation and hospitalizations for childhood asthma.
TLDR
In Scotland, passage of smoke-free legislation in 2006 was associated with a subsequent reduction in the rate of respiratory disease in populations other than those with occupational exposure to environmental tobacco smoke.
Meta-analysis of the effect of comprehensive smoke-free legislation on acute coronary events
TLDR
There is now a large body of evidence supporting a reduction in acute coronary events following the implementation of comprehensive smoke-free legislation, with the effect increasing over time from implementation.
Changes in child exposure to secondhand smoke after implementation of smoke-free legislation in Wales: a repeated cross-sectional study
TLDR
Smoke-free legislation in Wales did not increase secondhand smoke exposure in homes of children aged 10-11, but the legislation was associated with an unexpected reduction in cotinine levels among children with lower SHS exposure pre-legislation.
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