Effect of season and temperature on mortality in amphibians due to chytridiomycosis.

@article{Berger2004EffectOS,
  title={Effect of season and temperature on mortality in amphibians due to chytridiomycosis.},
  author={L. Berger and R. Speare and H. Hines and G. Marantelli and A. Hyatt and K. Mcdonald and L. Skerratt and V. Olsen and J. Clarke and G. Gillespie and M. Mahony and N. Sheppard and C. Williams and M. Tyler},
  journal={Australian veterinary journal},
  year={2004},
  volume={82 7},
  pages={
          434-9
        }
}
OBJECTIVE To investigate the distribution and incidence of chytridiomycosis in eastern Australian frogs and to examine the effects of temperature on this disease. DESIGN A pathological survey and a transmission experiment were conducted. PROCEDURE Diagnostic pathology examinations were performed on free-living and captive, ill and dead amphibians collected opportunistically from eastern Australia between October 1993 and December 2000. We conducted a transmission experiment in the… Expand
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