Effect of prior inoculation with chemical carcinogens on development of avian retrovirus-induced neoplasia in chickens.

Abstract

NUMEROUS investigations have dealt with the possibility that immunity against virus-induced neoplasia may be protective against subsequent exposure to chemical carcinogens. Despite some early evidence in support of this (Price et al., 1]977; Whitmire & Huebner, 1972) more recent experimentation has indicated that no simple correlation exists between prior exposure to oncogenic viruses and/or viral antigens and susceptibility to chemically induced cancer (Basombrio et al., 1977; Mishra et al., 1977). On the other hand, several laboratories have reported that treatment of normal cells or hosts with chemical carcinogens can lead to the expression of either endogenous virus particles or endogenous C-type viral RNA (Weiss et al., 1971; Young et al., 1978). This suggests the possibility that endogenous virus expression may occur in vivo after injection of carcinogens. Such a situation could in turn induce auto-immunization, with potential protection against exogenous oncogenic virus. We decided to pursue this possibility using the retrovirus-induced avian sarcoma. The sarcoma-bearing chicken has a number of advantages for the study of cancer development: 1. The tumour host is usually an outbred, non-laboratoryadapted animal (Vogt, 1965) though inbred strains and pathogen-free strains are Accepted 20 September 1979

DOI: 10.1038/bjc.1980.15

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Cite this paper

@article{Rohan1980EffectOP, title={Effect of prior inoculation with chemical carcinogens on development of avian retrovirus-induced neoplasia in chickens.}, author={Pretesh Rohan and M. A. Wainberg}, journal={British Journal of Cancer}, year={1980}, volume={41}, pages={130 - 135} }