Effect of position on oxygen saturation and requirement in convalescent preterm infants.

Abstract

AIMS To document the effect of position on oxygen saturation and changes in oxygen requirement in convalescent preterm infants. METHODS Twelve infants born ≥24 and ≤32 weeks gestation, extubated and without congenital anomaly were studied using nap polysomnography in prone and supine, twice weekly until discharge. Mean oxygen saturation (SpO(2)), minimum SpO(2) , mean minimum SpO(2) and time with SpO(2) < 90% were measured in active sleep. RESULTS Eight male and four female infants [median gestation 28 (24-31) weeks and median birthweight 1059 (715-1840) g] had 39 studies. For 21 of 39 studies, the infant was on respiratory support. Four infants had chronic lung disease (CLD). SpO(2) varied with postmenstrual age (PMA) (p = 0.003) but not with position (p = 0.36), and PMA did not influence the effect of position on SpO(2) (p = 0.19). SpO(2) was lower for those with CLD (p < 0.0001) and those on respiratory support (p < 0.001), but there was no effect of position (p = 0.97 and p = 0.67, respectively). From 36 weeks PMA, a change to supine did not increase oxygen requirement. CONCLUSION In preterm infants, PMA and residual respiratory disease have greater effects on oxygenation than position. A supine sleep position is not disadvantageous for preterm infants at discharge.

DOI: 10.1111/j.1651-2227.2011.02157.x

Cite this paper

@article{Elder2011EffectOP, title={Effect of position on oxygen saturation and requirement in convalescent preterm infants.}, author={Dawn Elizabeth Elder and Angela J P Campbell and Duncan C Galletly}, journal={Acta paediatrica}, year={2011}, volume={100 5}, pages={661-5} }